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The Dungeons and Dragons Prince
Yes, it's another campaign comic
Webcomic avatar
Profile
Language: English
Genre: Comedy
Activity status: Active
Archive url: Visit archive
Statistics
Last update: 2 days ago, 4:14 AM
Number of comics: 25
Number of subscribers: 3
Visitors: 434 visitors (3244 pages viewed)
Rating: 5 (6 votes)

Webcomic description

TD&DP is a campaign comic of The Dragon Prince, using screenshots from the show to tell the story of a D&D group struggling through the adventure and generally making a mess of things.

Authors

The Chessmaster
The Chessmaster
Hey, I'm an aspiring writer with a love for the simpler things in life, plus a few really complicated things. Sometimes I make webcomics.

Most recent comments left on The Dungeons and Dragons Prince

DeadpanSal
2 days ago
This is a weird compliment, but this is the cleanest campaign comic layout I've ever seen. Especially right at the start.
Left on Ezran Dice At the End
The Chessmaster
2 days ago
The Chessmaster
Whether or not a DM should actively try to kill their players really comes down to a matter of style. Players like different levels of challenge, and are more or less okay with losing characters. And while having no chance of failure makes for a boring campaign, spending half of each session rolling up new characters is about as interesting as making Perception checks against a newly-painted miniature.

The proper answer is to sit down with your players, discuss it, come to an agreement, and then decide to just kill them all anyway.
Left on Ezran Dice At the End
The Chessmaster
4 days ago
The Chessmaster
Inter-party conflict is always a difficult issue. Some players love it, some players hate it. The difficult part is that you usually run into some of both in any particular group. I've come around to just talking about it with the other players before the game if I think it'll come up, especially since I had to reboot a campaign once after it devolved into PvP.

Also, still experimenting with layout. I felt the opening shot of this scene deserved a big spot on the page, even if you can tell the trees are just two-dimensional.
Left on Hands Are For Magic Players
Friend of Fennecs
6 days ago
Friend of Fennecs
This is hilarious because it's so true. One of my current characters is a badass dual-wielding buffing warrior-mage... Or at least, she will be once she gains three levels and picks up the feats that will make her build semi-functional.
Left on He's Proficient in Carts, Though
The Chessmaster
6 days ago
The Chessmaster
In character design, you have to walk the fine line between viable now and viable at higher levels. Personally, I mostly struggled with this when making paladins in D&D 3.5. By 6th level, 3.5 paladins have at-will detect evil, turn undead, an ability that adds their Cha to all saves, healing powers, immunity to fear and disease (even supernatural or magic), spells, a special mount, and the ability to smite evil twice in one round to deliver massive pain. By 20th level, paladins have... slightly more uses of all of that stuff, and linear increase in smite/turn undead power. By mid-level, it was easy to feel you were just throwing away levels by advancing as a paladin.

Multiclassing was always a tempting option, but once you did that, you could never increase your paladin level again. Additionally, you had to stay lawful good to retain your paladin powers, so even though a multiclass bard/paladin would be almost unstoppable, they could only use their full power while lawful good and only gain bard levels when they weren't lawful.

As a result, I used to plan out my paladin's careers ten levels or more in advance, even at level 1. Then I switched to 5E and suddenly paladins progressed at pretty much the same speed as other classes, and lost the multiclassing and alignment restrictions. Coincidentally, I think about 3 of my first 5 characters in that edition were paladins.
Left on He's Proficient in Carts, Though