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Result in thread: Global Warming.
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7th Sep 2018, 2:48 PM #1
Dodom
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BlueDragon:I remember my bearded dragon that a friend's mom needed to give away cause her son moved out and left him (and I am known as the crazy animal lady--people used to dump their unwanted pets on me a lot o_O) You should stick with the live worms: I tried the dead ones, and he/she was very disinterested.


Oh I meant dead ones for me, in the hypothetical situation where I'd want to eat them myself. I think it's less disgust than pity that stops me from trying. For creatures that eat meat, humans aren't naturally good at killing.
I'll stick to live ones for the dragon though; she clearly enjoys hunting and I wouldn't deprive her of that. She accepts canned crickets because even though they're dead, she likes their taste, but she can't stalk and catch those!
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7th Sep 2018, 12:44 AM #2
Dodom
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Bonjour!
Bienvenue, il commence à y avoir vraiment beaucoup de francophones par ici... alors quand tu veux, on se met ensemble et on prend le contrôle, hahaha!
Ta bande dessinée a l'air intéressante, j'y jette un coup d'oeil tout de suite!
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Result in thread: Global Warming.
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6th Sep 2018, 1:46 AM #3
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To be honest I wish it was easier to shake off a cultural aversion for insect meat, because with the pure joy a lizard expresses when presented a superworm, it has to be absolutely delicious. It might be easier if I got them pre-killed, but when I catch one and it's squirming between my fingers, I feel bad about killing it, so they're only for the lizard.

Also if you want your own worms, don't buy an expensive kit, plastic storage boxes and empty food containers house them perfectly, just be sure to make the air holes large enough to let moisture out, if you don't want to discover you've been breeding mites.
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17th Aug 2018, 4:19 PM #4
Dodom
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- First thing that'll drive me towards a comic is the genre. I may have missed out on nice comics because it didn't advertise what it was about.
- Of course good art attracts attention at first, so a nice looking comic has more chances of being checked out in general. Again, I may have skipped on good comics because it looked too sloppy. But if I made it past that and found out the comic was good, I won't quit reading over it, unless it really makes it hard to follow the story, like if the characters are hard to tell apart.
- Monstrous designs. Like weird original monster designs and certain types of body horror. I could follow a mediocre comic if it has the right kind of bizarre designs.
- Clever writing. What that means is very subjective, but if your thought process takes the story through places I wouldn't have expected but make total sense in the context, I love it.


What'll drive me away:
- Authors who try to shame readers out of criticising. It's a thing not to want certain types of feedback. Like, if you say "I'm working on this at my own pace I'm not looking for criticism right now" I'll totally respect that. But if you go "If real deal opinions offend your snowflake feelz you'll hate this comic", yeah no, if you think readers are somehow defective for not liking your content I don't expect a lot of thought to have gone into it, I'll leave you to rub your own belly without my assistance.
- Some art styles don't work for me. Aside from overly sloppy ones, I have trouble with certain types of over-detailing, like if you draw a muscular hero and all their muscles are outlined individually like the character was built out of meat scraps, I find it gross. Unless they're meant to be gross like they're a thousand giant maggots in a skin suit, then you get a pass.
- Bad ratio between complexity and engagement. And there, I know I did that with Fairy Dust, too many characters, too many subplots, not enough fun to make them worth the effort. But that makes me all the more aware of when another comic does it. Eventually, if something's going to be a casual, low attention read, I won't remember 50 characters.
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Result in thread: Heed this warning
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17th Aug 2018, 1:33 PM #5
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I know this will sound a bit unorthodox, but: he could wear an eyepatch even if his eye is good.
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14th Aug 2018, 3:00 PM #6
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Well if it was healthy, it wouldn't be junk food anymore!

Though I get what you mean, so lets see...
What makes something an attractive food to overindulge in are the experience itself (taste/texture), ease of preparation and cost.

Ease: Grandma always got us to binge on cauliflower and assorted vegetables by preparing them into bite sized chunks and leaving them on a plate with a little bowl of dip. Kids in general are known to accept food more easily if it's not a hassle to eat. Like a child who won't eat an apple has a good chance to accept apple wedges. If it's right there and you just have to reach for it, there are good chances you eventually will.
Junk food covers a lot of things that can be kept ready to eat. A chocolate bar in its wrapper, a sealed bag of chips, they'll wait for months for the moment you crave some instant gratification. While you can't prepare a plate of carrot sticks and have them ready the next week, you have to make them the same day and the carrot themselves can't be too old either.
Improved preservation techniques would expand what people can consume impulsively and hopefully add healthier options.

Cost: Potato chips are cheap. Instant Ramen is cheap. McDonald's... it depends on where you live. But in many relevant places, it's cheap. Refined sugar gives you thousands of calories a dollar.
But most fruit are expensive. You can have apples and bananas and prunes for cheap, but if you don't like some of those that's not many alternatives. Preparing a vegetable casserole adds 20$ to one's groceries bill in one go. Tasty salads are expensive so instead people buy Iceberg lettuce and drown it in dressing. Home cooking requires a steep starting investment to get the cookware, appliances and basic ingredients together.
Junk food has to be cheap to be viable. So it has to be made with cheap ingredients. And that greatly limits how healthy it can be. The economic side of things will have to be tackled to get real improvement.

Taste and texture: that's the trickiest part. Because while easy and cheap can eventually be controlled, people do pick comfort food for a certain sensory experience, and it's hard to change recipes without changing that. The government here attempted to force beer companies to add vitamins to their brews (because alcoholics sometimes go as far as getting their calories from beer and not eating much else) but that didn't pass because vitamins would perceivably alter the beer's taste. Bite into a multivitamin if you want to see for yourself, that's not something you can just hide in food and leave it unchanged.
Junk food is also usually low fiber. It'd be coarser if it wasn't. And the ingredients fibers come from also have a taste. Personally, I hate the taste of wheat bran, and that's usually what's used to add fibers. (though thanks to gluten-free food's popularity there are thankfully more options these days)
And some of the problems are also inherent to their appealing qualities. Dental malocclusion (where teeth aren't merely crooked, but actually can't close together) is a typically North American problem, because the food's softness doesn't provide the mechanical stimulus the bone needs to keep teeth pointing the right way. You don't have to work hard on a bite of BigMac before you can swallow it. You can't make junk food healthy without entirely destroying that quality.


In conclusion:
There is some extent to which making junk food healthier will require changing consumer habits. Healthy junk food just won't taste and feel exactly the same, and we'll have to get used to it.
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Result in thread: Heed this warning
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13th Aug 2018, 2:21 PM #7
Dodom
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Now the question is, why would Kyo need to mix cement so often. I'm beginning to have a suspicion about where the bodies went!
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4th Aug 2018, 10:51 PM #8
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inky:Okay so I already knew what the yellow liquid was, and now I've learned about the red one,

But what about the purple substance that leaks from my eyes every morning?


I had yellow-greenish liquid coming out of my eyes while I had a bacterial infection which convinced me that sinusitis is not actually a disease, but a curse.


Back to the topic of blood:
My favourite thing about blood is carbonic acid. Carbonic acid is a chemical that sort-of exists-ish. It ought to exist because otherwise CO2 and water couldn't turn into carbonate, and carbonate obviously exists. You wouldn't be eating chalk if carbonate didn't exist. But it's also too unstable not to instantaneously turn into either carbonate or CO2 and water without having the time to actually exist.
But we need it to live. A very precise carbonic acid/carbonate balance is needed to control our blood chemistry, we'd die instantly if that chemical that doesn't quite exist didn't exist. So instead our red blood cells (think of them like fat hamsters except really small, that mental image should do for now) have an enzyme called carbonic anhydrase, that is constantly flipping the CO2/carbonate reaction around, like when your parents told you to stop playing with the light switch but more annoying. So while no carbonic acid is actually released, there always are plenty of halfway transformed molecules that just look enough like carbonic acid to fake it. We literally live off wishful thinking.
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Result in thread: Fish out of water
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1st Aug 2018, 11:58 PM #9
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It's ok I can make water!

Burns a very large tank of hydrogen in an energy inefficient way; there is now a small pond of pure water here but the planet is 0.02 degrees warmer.

Just for you! C:
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Result in thread: Goat appreciation thread
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1st Aug 2018, 1:16 AM #10
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Goat fact: a goat WILL ride other animals if it can get away with it.

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31st Jul 2018, 2:37 PM #11
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Driving a flying car manually assuming I'm qualified for it? Sure. Sharing urban aerial routes among ten thousand other manually flown cars? No way! There could be compromises, like AI assisted driving, where you steer for the most part but it won't let you do dangerous manoeuvres. But generally there are enough accidents on plain old roads without having traffic on top and below oneself. No matter how good one is at keeping track of a 3-d environment, human senses aren't really made to be alert to so many directions at once, eventually you won't see the idiot doing an illegal lane change below your feet.
Also being in the air creates more vulnerability: grazing against another car or a pole is an embarrassing accident, but ultimately it's a new paint job's business to fix it. It's another story if a bump could cause the car to stall and crash.

I'd be all for free flying areas so people can have fun doing all the manoeuvres they want even if they're not totally safe, but not between buildings and over pedestrians.


And that's all said assuming flying cars are a good idea in the first place. Expanded public transportation, commute reducing urban planning and rapid trains for long distances sound like a better solution for most purposes. (and before anyone says it, yes expanded public transportation includes expanded accessibility)
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Result in thread: Goat appreciation thread
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29th Jul 2018, 3:20 PM #12
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It's ok they think regular goats are extremely fancy. Except Harry. That one is an embarrasment to goatdom.
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28th Jul 2018, 4:10 PM #13
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I had a little javascript that replaced the top layer image with an alternative. The default image is a fairy and a human's silhouette. But there's a 7% chance on each page view to get one of the 7 alternate pictures. Instead you can get an orc, a troll, a dapper leprechaun, a fairy child sitting in a human hand, the human villains, and the doge meme. That's not 7 but I don't remember the others right now and don't feel like looking :P
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Result in thread: Global Warming.
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26th Jul 2018, 2:34 PM #14
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I partially disagree. Do adjust your habits to do your part within your capabilities, but don't disregard the need for political action. Because overall, industry and business account for much more environmental impact than everyone's personal use put together, and it's regulation and incentives that have any power to force companies to use responsible methods. You need the government on your side if you want real change.


Edited to remove rambling bit.
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24th Jul 2018, 5:56 PM #15
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I suspect most extra senses would need to have an output similar to an existing sense for an un-modified brain to understand their input. But I can think of some that could work even within those limits!

Dielectric sensing, to detect stress changes in materials. What would be the point of turning it into a sense rather than displaying the readings on a screen? Well when thinking about futuristic technologies anyway, there's cyborg technology, power armor, or even meccha. Those things would be safer to use if they could have a sense of pain. A person wearing a power armor shouldn't be able to ignore the power armor's arm being about to snap, because when it does it might just well rip off their own arm. So being able to get a crude feeling of how one's tools are doing could optimise their use.

Ultrasound probing, to see inside things. Not all ultrasounds are the high resolution things that give a silhouette on a screen. There are ultrasound probes designed to detect cracks in mechanical parts, those only return a spike on a graph as a reading. A sensor that gives a one dimentional output like that could be translated into just any sensory input.

Customisable smells. Humans have thousands of genes for olfactory receptors, but only a handful are active, since our olfactory lobe is too small to decode complex aromas anyway. But since chemoceptors are neurons that can regenerate, it'd be possible to activate some of these genes depending on what one wants from their nose at any point of life. A parent of a diabetic child could want to be extra sensitive to ketones so they'd immediately know if a diabetic coma is coming. A food lover could want even subtler enjoyment of flavours. Someone who works around toxic chemicals could want to know if that damp patch on their clothes is just sweat or something they need to get off their body immediately. As said, our olfactory lobe is too small to get the full range all at once, but one might want to specialise. It would also likely be reversible, as the chemoceptors renew themselves, if the treatment isn't continued it'd fall back to their original genetic setup.

Related to the previous point: chemoceptors with IgE receptors. IgEs are the antibodies that trigger allergies, and unfortunately, the only way they can communicate with the brain is by causing massive release of histamine and making everything feel terrible. Creating a clone of scent receptors that'll receive the host's IgEs and send a signal when they bind to something would alert people before they bite into something they shouldn't eat.
Or the same with IgG receptors; instead of allergens it'd sense pathogens, so you only ever eat salmonella once.
I'm fond of that one because it'd save lives, it's almost feasible with current biotechnology, and by its very nature it'd be customised to the user's exact needs.


As to whether I'd use them, well as long as they're not cumbersome or overly demanding in maintenance, yeah.
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Result in thread: How a Starship Works?
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21st Jul 2018, 3:37 AM #16
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GMan003:
4) Gravity

Current spacecraft do not have artificial gravity. It's not actually necessary. Sci-fi writers usually only bother making something up if they want their story to be filmable, because filming in zero gravity is kind of a pain in the ass.


I disagree that this is the *only* reason to have artificial gravity.
Spinning spaceships don't currently exist because they need to be large to work, spinning the whole ship creates docking and space walk hazards, and spinning only parts of the ship requires to access the centrifuge area via the axis, meaning a sealed moving joint at least a person's size, meaning a serious challenge to maintain air pressure, and too much vibrations to run 0g experiments in the static part. Either way, engineering constraints all over.
It's not that they wouldn't do it if it wasn't too difficult (and it probably won't stay too difficult forever) because staying in a 0g environment for any serious time is a health hazard. Gravity is necessary to maintain bone density, muscle mass, coordination and balance, heart function, blood pressure, and other subtler things that are still being figured out.
Once technology allows making spinning ships and making them safe, that'll probably be a preferable option over trying to palliate for all the health effects that come with 0g environments.

So my opinion is: if you're writing future space tech, don't dismiss the gravity issue. Unless your characters are robots or aliens whose biology is nothing like humans', or your story involves how characters palliate for those effects. Special actuator suits that resist movement to stimulate muscles? Drugs? Spacefaring population that can't return to a planet? Genetic selection to pick people who'll tolerate it best (or genetic engineering)?
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3rd Jul 2018, 2:52 PM #17
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My advice is not to go into this alone: at the slightest sign of paranormal activity, tell EVERYONE. Always steer conversation towards your ghosts. When people stop talking to you, call their home to tell them about the ghosts. They might block your number eventually but it's ok you're friends you know where they live. Tell your boss, coworkers, customers and everyone you meet at work. That's one thing work is good for, networking! Just keep telling everyone, don't worry about annoying them, they're safer too if they're well informed!
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3rd Jul 2018, 1:54 PM #18
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I don't personally feel any need for it right now, but I believe that would be a good thing in general. Fully abled people can use them if they find them handy, but for people with disability, they might represent more autonomy than human helpers can provide.
Hired humans have limited time, they have to sleep and have their own life, so if someone needs one to go about their day, they have to arrange their time around their availability. They can even grow to hate the person they care for, if their personalities clash, abuse by caretakers isn't unheard of! A machine, on the other hand, doesn't get bored and hardly sleeps, and certainly won't be programmed to be able to hate. There's also less issues with privacy if a machine sees your intimate habits than a person.
I'm assuming some of those assistants would be controlling more or less versatile robotic devices so they can physically assist, while others would be in devices like computers and smartphones. The formers' usefulness is obvious. The latter could allow people with moderate mental disabilities to have full independence by guiding them through the stuff they can't master themselves while letting them handle the things they do inderstand, or replace some assistance animals. A guide dog is great, but if a piece of electronics can do the same with almost no maintenance and can be built in any number without having to train each separately, a lot will prefer that. The ones who love dogs can still have them as pets, dogs won't be abolished!
Machines of various primary purposes could also automatically call first responders if the user has a fall, blood sugar outside certain limits, and whatever can threaten them with their specific health status.

tl;dr: Sure it can be handy and I'm cool with people using those for any reason, but I'm more hopeful about the possibilities for disabled or elderly people if such devices become smart enough.
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29th Jun 2018, 6:11 AM #19
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Judging from your reply, I must have sounded more dismissive of 3-D printing's future than I intended.
I meant that it's going to be added to available manufacturing methods rather than outright replacing them, not that it won't have a place at all. Some material properties require specific production methods to obtain, and there'll always be an advantage to mass production when it comes to efficiency. So the future will still have factories.
I don't think you're arguing against that, either, so we seem to agree on the main lines, even if we probably have different ideas of the details.
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Result in thread: text does some 3D models
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28th Jun 2018, 4:29 PM #20
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I'm suspicious of Kyo's desire for pine cones. What does he want to do with them? Some form of terrorist activity?

[spoiler]
PINE CONES ARE WEAPONS OF WAR
Image: http://i65.tinypic.com/34gltdt.gif
[/spoiler]
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