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3 days ago, 8:54 PM #1
NeilKapit

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Steven-Vincent:I'm not immune to new things. I just haven't seen, for example, any director since Hitchcock with as consistent an ability to tell good stories. Or any singer with a voice that I like better than Patti Page's.


"I've been carrying this rock with me and I've never been attacked by tigers. Ergo, this rock must protect me against tigers and I must cradle it to my chest at all times."
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3 days ago, 7:26 AM #2
NeilKapit

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Great mix of classic Scooby and new "Scooby Apocalypse" styling. I never got past the first issue of the comic, since it looked so ridiculously edgelordy, but I hope it got better.

And finally, WYRECATS IS BACK!
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3 days ago, 7:02 AM #3
NeilKapit

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3 days ago, 3:08 AM #4
NeilKapit

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Steven-Vincent:You asked for thoughts, Tib, so here are some of mine.

Not only don't I have any issue with nostalgia or "older things;" in many cases I revel in them. This should be obvious from the fact that I unrelentingly champion the qualities of the print comics bronze age. I stand forever by my assertion that those are the greatest comic-books ever written, and that nothing produced today in print comics can even come close. You don't have to agree of course, but I won't shy away from it. The stories of Bill Mantlo, for example, are far better executed than anything on the stands today.

You mention sitcoms... The Dick Van Dyke show remains probably the greatest sitcom of all time. It had better acting than anything on the air today. The first half of season 1 was a little bumpy as they tried to figure out what they wanted to do with the show but once they realized it was about Rob Petrie's family and not the TV show on which he was a writer, they churned out 4.5 years of pure gold. "Gazundheit, darling" stands to this day as one of the three or four funniest half-hour episodes of television ever written. I never saw this as a kid (it was off the air by the time I was born) but I saw it as a college student 25 years later and I literally fell off the chair laughing more than once. I laughed so hard I thought I was going to have a heart attack. Nothing on the air today is that funny. And it wasn't the only episode to be hilariously funny, just the best one.

Movies... Hitchcock is the greatest director of all time, IMO. Nobody knew how to hold a shot like he did... how to raise tension... how to surprise you by doing exactly what you expected but in a totally unexpected way. Rebecca, Strangers on a Train, North by Northwest, The Birds, Psycho, Vertigo, Rope. The list goes on and on.

Music... Patti Page is my favorite singer of all time. She was popular when my father was young. Apparently he liked her too, although he died in 1982 and I don't recall him ever mentioning her. My mother told me a few years ago when I found Patti and she said I was "just like my father." Since he couldn't have influenced me verbally, maybe it's genetic. But her voice is the richest and most capable one I have ever heard. I have probably listened to her rendition of Tennessee Waltz 1,000 times over the years. Even silly songs like "Doggie in the Window," she gave that something extra. And then there are other great singers like Doris Day, Patsy Cline. Again, I would argue that nobody today has the talent and capability of these older singers -- or if they do, I sure as hell haven't heard it. There's too much shouting in music these days, and not enough actual singing.

So... Nostalgia? The "good old days." I say, bring 'em on. I've had some of the greatest times of my life reading Bill Mantlo comics, watching Honeymooners or Dick Van Dyke or Bob Newhart, taking in Hitchcock, or listening to Patti or Patsy. Why should I do anything other than revel in those things?


Because humanity is always growing, changing, and evolving, even if individual humans or specific cultures aren't. Nostalgia is fine as an indulgence, but at best, it's a defeatist luxury, and at worst, a destructive regression. Or need I remind everyone that the slogan "Make America Great AGAIN" is what brought us spiraling downwards into the current crisis...

Merged Doublepost:

Also, I think Bill Mantlo was a good writer who suffered a horrible fate I wouldn't (severe brain damage during the 1990s requiring constant care to this date), but I don't like holding any one creator as the golden standard of what everything in their medium and/or genre should be.
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6 days ago, 3:54 AM #5
NeilKapit

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Dodo birds, because I'd like something cute and harmless rather than something that would eat and/or crush me
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10 days ago, 7:03 AM #6
NeilKapit

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KAZUHIRA MILLER CONFIRMED FOR SMASH! Wait, it's only as a spirit? Awww, THEY PLAYED US LIKE A DAMN FIDDLE!
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10 days ago, 1:33 AM #7
NeilKapit

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Howdy howdy howdy!
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21st Oct 2018, 2:20 AM #8
NeilKapit

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Would it be enough to offset the 100 companies responsible for around 70% of the emissions? Not all polluters are equal, and making it about individual responsibility undermines how much of a class issue climate change is (not just that the wealthiest people have so much invested in pollution, but that the effects of climate change hit the marginalized hardest).
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18th Oct 2018, 3:45 AM #9
NeilKapit

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E-hero Vulven:The planet is and never was a safe space. The dinosaurs, and other species, went extinct despite not dumping plastic or styrofoam like humans do. Every day you step outside, you accept the minuscule risk that something out there might inadvertently injure or cut your life short. Just do what you can at the local/personal level and leave the rest to God or whatever deity you believe in. Wow, I really don't have anything useful to say lol Nature, like Chaos, is fair.


If you didn't have anything useful to say then why bother saying it? What did you possibly gain by looking at people who actually care and saying that you don't?
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18th Oct 2018, 2:13 AM #10
NeilKapit

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People are still speaking as if this isn't already happening, as if people aren't already being displaced and killed in a dramatic uptick of natural disasters. :(
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11th Oct 2018, 5:27 AM #11
NeilKapit

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Matt Comics:imo, the 80s were the best era of superhero comics. (I'm more familiar with Marvel, but I assume many things were the same in other companies)

Stories were better than in the 60s and 70s while still respecting the source material, something you don't see very often nowadays. Continuity respect and coordination were at their peak. Many important and highly respected runs happened in this decade. Change was innovative and positive, unlike today's sensationalistic stunts. Mildly obscure characters had a chance to get miniseries, before money was the only valid reason for starting a new series.

Marvel still had respect for its original heroes. They weren't massively killed off/injured/sent off-planet/lost in comics limbo for the sake of being replaced with newbies whose main selling point is diversity. Most of the replacement heroes created in recent years are actually great characters, but why do they have to come at the expense of the founding figures? Can't they just be totally new characters and leave the classic heroes alone? This makes a lot of writers look like borderline SJWs.

granted, the 80s also had the seeds of the crossover madness that is still plaguing the industry today, and slowly but surely led to the ridiculous darkness and indecent fanservice of many 90s comics.

but superhero comics as a whole never reached those standards again. (unless they did in the 2000s? I admit I barely know anything about this decade) in fact, it seems to be the opposite: the 80s were an awesome decade with some flaws, while modern comics tend to be shallow, movie-driven stuff with hidden gems here and there.

(also, I swear I tried to make this reply short and sweet, but it seems I can't be concise on this topic XD)


I don't mind it in movies because it's fine to experiment in another medium, but I don't like when comics feel forced to mirror those movies and replace iconic costumes with weird stuff. Seriously, it somehow looks weirder in comics than irl.


Specifics, please. Not general eras and pining for the good old days. I'd like to know which works, by which creators, are the gold standard. Which works do you point to as that which we all should follow in supers? Why are they that, from as objective a standpoint as you can get with art and craft?
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10th Oct 2018, 12:44 AM #12
NeilKapit

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Matt Comics:woah, I'm away for a while and this thread grows bigger than expected :O

Here's the thing, GMan: you won't get an acceptable experience of superhero stories with modern comics. or many 90s comics, for that matter. at some point in the early 90s, the new and hot creators decided to throw continuity and decency away to indulge in crass commercialism. Nowadays, most people just stopped even pretending they respected the universes they work for.

the current golden rules of comics seem to be "continuity is boring, let's not bother with it", "change is good!!!1!! let's have no respect for a ton of important characters", "character development? you must be kidding", "political correctness at the expense of the story is awesome" and "MARKETING DRIVES EVERYTHING".

oh, I still manage to enjoy many modern comics, because many stories are still fun and/or interesting, and good creators still exist, but I'll always consider modern comics as a whole an inferior mockery on some level.

So yes, if you dislike that, you're absolutely right. But this doesn't apply to the most important superhero comics, those made before all this garbage happened. Not that old comics can't be bad. Bad stories can happen in any time period, and lame superhero conventions/tropes also exist. But back then, creators actually tried to exploit those universes in positive ways. The current attitude is just detrimental to the priceless legacy left by many amazing stories, no matter how silly they could be.

(and before someone thinks I sound like a nostalgic old man, I'm actually in my early 20s)

mostly irrelevant addendum: I heard the early 2000s got a surprising number of good runs, but I've yet to get to that in my huge readthrough...


OK, so what would you point to as the golden ideal of comic books that all these blasphemous hollow corporate PC police modern comics don't live up to?
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8th Oct 2018, 5:39 AM #13
NeilKapit

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Steven-Vincent:That was your big mistake. The New 52 is utter sewage. I say this as someone who for years as a child was a DC fan (back when comic-books were actually good).

You've perfectly described the awfulness of the New 52. And this description fits all current, or as I call it, "Dark" age, Marvel and DC comics. But things weren't always like this. Both DC and Marvel used to put out good stuff, once upon a time.

Present-day comics are hampered by two things: First, the writers are terrible. They do not have the talent or cleverness of the old guard. And they are utterly disrespectful of that past material, precisely because even they (the DC/Marvel writers) think that superheroes are "silly." They don't respect their own source material so how can they do it justice?

But even worse, it doesn't matter if the writers are any good or not because the writers don't control the story -- marketing does. Plots are written by the marketing execs now, not by the writers. Comic-books are little more than click-bait anymore. And since even one movie makes more money in a few weeks of release than the entire Marvel or DC line will make in several years, the comics are just IP farms for the movie producers now.

So, you won't find much that's any good on the stands anymore, and haven't been able to for years. People like Grant Morrison, Geoff Johns, Jason Aaron -- the "top writers" of today? -- they're all hacks. They have no idea how ton construct a story, execute a plot, or write dialogue. It's all universally terrible.

But it wasn't always thus. Back in the 70s and 80s, the "bronze age," comics had some pretty damn amazing writers. Bill Mantlo (Rom and Micronauts -- comics based on toys of all things). Doug Moench. Paul Levitz (during his original LSH run). Walt Simonson (his Thor remains the greatest run in the history of superhero comics, IMO). Barbara Kesel. Mary Jo Duffy. These people knew what they were doing back then. They wrote great stories that kept you turning pages and coming back to the comic shops.

But most of those people are gone from comics. The few still employed, like Levitz, don't turn out what they used to anymore. Either they've lost their touch, or (more likely) aren't allowed to write the stories like they used to because the marketing department won't let them.

But that's all just a pathological situation within modern print comics. It's not really got anything to do with superheroes, as a genre. The same happens to any storytelling process when you put the marketing department in charge. Just look at the new Star Wars movies as another example.


That's an awful lot of words to just say you're afraid of change. Were you reading things other than Marvel and DC superheroes in comics?
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30th Sep 2018, 4:53 AM #14
NeilKapit

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DrFurball:The episode "Powerless", of "The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes".
Surtur makes his final appearance in the series, after previous episodes hinted at an adaptation of the "Surtur Saga" storyline...and none of the Avengers even get to meet him. Nothing ever comes from that foreshadowing. Amora is now willingly under his control, despite being his prisoner in her previous appearance (even begging for Thor to kill her).

Also, the Avengers get cursed with a loss of their powers, in order for them to learn humility...which was Thor's entire character arc in the first season. Continuity is thrown away, and it just feels like an attempt to capitalize on the then-recent Thor movie, while also talking down to its audience, who weren't used to getting a story with such a heavy-handed moral lesson.

The reception was so bad that it wasn't even premiered on TV, but on the DVD release.

I love the show overall. The only cartoon based on a Marvel Comic that beats it is The Spectacular Spider-Man. But "Powerless!" is just...bad.


It was also a dire portent of the show's replacement Avengers Assemble, where ongoing stories and character arcs were largely scrapped in lieu of single episodes where characters Learn Lessons (that they always end up forgetting and repeating, of course).
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30th Sep 2018, 3:13 AM #15
NeilKapit

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The "Beer Bad" episode of Buffy Season 4, with the heroine drinking magic beer that regresses her to a Cro-Magnon.
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Result in thread: Autumn Bay
24th Sep 2018, 11:55 PM #16
NeilKapit

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You're back! Hooray!
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22nd Sep 2018, 11:55 PM #17
NeilKapit

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Kneel before Allie
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18th Sep 2018, 5:11 AM #18
NeilKapit

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16th Sep 2018, 4:35 AM #19
NeilKapit

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I've been working in special needs services for the past seven years, in different capacities. Currently I work as a caretaker for adults with extremely high support needs. It is extremely hard work but everyone deserves the right to be a part of society, even if they need a lot of help with basic tasks.
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Result in thread: Reviewing your webcomics
4th Sep 2018, 4:48 AM #20
NeilKapit

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Volunteering Wyrecats, thank you
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