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Result in thread: Your Best Comic Page
10 days ago, 10:45 AM #1
Saeriellyn

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Registration date: 6th Feb 2015
Location: Florida
Some excellent pages! I see several comics here I want to check out.

I've got several faves, but this one still stands out. The colors, the landscape, and the drama in the expressions all came together exactly as I wanted them to, and it was the first in an action sequence that was really satisfying and exciting to do. It was one of those pages that became a little annoying later because it raised the quality bar up to a level I can't always (or even usually) hit consistently. But I always come back to it when I need to remind myself of what I can do when I push myself.

[img]image lexus rc350 0 60[/img]
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Result in thread: tablet discussion
Two weeks ago, 9:24 PM #2
Saeriellyn

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Registration date: 6th Feb 2015
Location: Florida
keltyzoid!:i swear to god if anyone comes in here saying "i draw traditionally and have no opinion lol" i'll punch you in the neck

recently got my first Big Boy tablet (XP Pen Artist 12) with a fancy screen you can draw on and it's really nice. i bought my boyfriend the XP Pen Artist 13.3 or whatever the fuck it's called and now neither of us are using our Wacom/Bamboo tablets. now, i've been watching reviews of tablets for a while, and i watched one that compared the 200-something dollar Artist 12 to the Cintiq 13 HD, and it made me wonder why anyone buys Cintiq or Wacom tablet, because a 200 Dollar tablet from china had better specs than the 800 dollar name brand tablet everyone loses their minds over.

do people only buy Cintiq tablets because they want to flex on people with a name brand now that there's a load of competitors with better tech and lower prices? do people think that owning an 800 dollar tablet means they're a professional artist?

also i recommend getting an XP Pen tablet with a screen, since they're cheap and your whole life will change when you realize how much easier it is to draw directly on the screen.



I have a Cintiq. Bought my first one used off ebay but it still was a nice chunk of cash. It was an older model 22" wide and weighed a crap ton. After working on a tablet for years it was like going from scratching on a rock with a knife to drawing with pencil and paper.

Two or three years after I bought it I got one of those XP pen screens so I could hook something portable up to my laptop. It was a 12" screen I think. I absolutely hated it. It was laggy, the parallax was way off, the stylus did not have anything like the same pressure sensitivity, and the damn thing would not stay calibrated. I tried to tough it out for a couple months but it would make me so pissed every time I tried to use it I finally gave up. It's still collecting dust in a cabinet somewhere. Granted, this was a couple years ago, and it was one of the first in the line of wacom competitors, so I'm certain that the tech has improved quite a lot.

My old Cintiq finally died a few months ago and Wacom no longer supports it. I tried replacing it with a Surface Pro and had all the same issues I had had with the XP Pen. Long story short, there's a new Cintiq on my desk right now and it had better last fifteen years for what I paid for it, but it performs like I need it to.

I guess it does sound like snobbery. But so far, nothing else I have experience with is like working with a Cintiq. The rest all feel like a step backwards. Even the ipad pro and pencil aren't quite as sweet an experience, although they come closer to anything else I have tried. But I can imagine that if you're coming from using a pen tablet of some kind, anything with a screen you can draw on is a giant leap forward.

In all honesty I hope a reasonably-priced competitor DOES clean sweep Wacom out of its position as the go-to art hardware supplier. It's BS that I had to throw out a perfectly good machine, older though it was, that cost 3K brand new because they arbitrarily decided to stop updating the drivers and ignored compatibility with Apple.

But until somebody makes one that performs like a Cintiq, Wacom will own my soul.
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Result in thread: Webcomic "Advice"
Two weeks ago, 9:05 PM #3
Saeriellyn

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Location: Florida
When you're sick of drawing the same faces again and again during a long conversation...what do you think the good creators of your software developed copy-and-paste for?

Also, silhouetting your characters against a gradient works every time.
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Two weeks ago, 12:52 PM #4
Saeriellyn

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Even if you ARE worried about appropriation, no culture or ethnicity owns dreads. They've been worn by loads of different groups, some of them even *gasp* white Europeans (germanic tribes, vikings, etc). You can safely use them and ignore anybody who wants to squawk about it. No patience with that nonsense.
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Result in thread: Copyright and Fanart
31st Dec 2018, 12:44 AM #5
Saeriellyn

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As someone whose entire comic is based on copyrighted work...

Legally you have no leg to stand on. You can make every disclaimer and never turn a penny but the holder of the rights can still sue you if they want to. However, the likelihood of it is so extraordinarily small it is not worth worrying about. The amount of fanart online is impossible to police even for titans like Disney (though they will, certainly, come after anyone who profits excessively from their IP). At most, typically, the IP owner will tell you to take it down from the internet - but going through the process of suing some random plebe who drew their character for a webcomic is not worth their time or money.

You have to live with the possibility, however remote, that you might at some point be served with a cease-and-desist letter and see all your work and effort go to nothing when you have to pull it from display.

If you can handle that, knock yourself out.
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17th May 2018, 5:23 PM #6
Saeriellyn

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Streaming now, persnickety little things but if anybody is bored...clickety click
ETA: done for the day
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3rd Apr 2018, 3:41 PM #7
Saeriellyn

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Registration date: 6th Feb 2015
Location: Florida
I have mild social anxieties, but I've never found it stressful to respond with a, "thanks for reading!" or "I appreciate your taking the time to comment!" even if I can't think of anything else to say. Obviously if this is all I EVER did that would become trite and annoying, but it serves just fine much of the time, particularly to those minimalist comments of "this is cool!" or whatever. Obviously if somebody is writing some novel it is too simplistic, but I love nothing more than discussing my comic, so comments like that are my lifeblood and hell yes I respond to every one.

I try to respond to most, more or less, and I love that by doing so I have developed some loyal fans. Partially I do it because I'm not a big comic-follower - there are long-time readers whose work I've checked out, unfortunately not been interested in, but wished I could reciprocate in some way for their faithfulness. So I try to always acknowledge them as the least I can do. Also, comments are so rare (in my experience, it's about three out of every hundred visitors) that I want to show my appreciation for them personally. What good is it to say I appreciate every comment? Who's going to know that if I don't express it directly to the commenter? Somebody took the time to type crap on a phone, most likely, and we all know how annoying that is. It takes two words to thank them for it.

And yeah, if I comment faithfully for a while and the artist never responds, I'll usually stop commenting. It just feels like they don't care whether I do or not so why waste my time. I've wondered, in those times, why some creators don't respond (unless it's obvious, like they have hundreds of comments and literally can't, but that's rare). So this thread is eye-opening.

The internet can feel like a lonely place when you've put your heart's work out there and get crickets. But IMO it goes both ways; if you want people to engage with you, you need to make an effort to be engaging in return. That's life.
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11th Feb 2018, 5:26 PM #8
Saeriellyn

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Miaubol:Image


I’m going to use this from now on whenever I’m accused of excessive verbosity. Just doing my part in the rebellion.
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11th Feb 2018, 3:36 PM #9
Saeriellyn

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This is a tough place for any creator, the desire for validation, for the assurance that somebody out there appreciates your work. It's hard to get, and I'm going to be old and curmudgeonly and blame smartphones and facebook.

Warning: VAST GENERALIZATION AHEAD.

When I started posting my artwork online, back in the dark ages of elfwood.com, commenting was a huge thing. They were frequent and generous. I don't have any numbers to reference, but I am absolutely certain that the ratio of pageviews/comments was far, far more proportionate than it is now. I was on that site for about a decade, and it was the very early days of smartphone rollout. As tiny pocket computers with impossible-to-type screen keyboards became more and more ubiquitous, the number of people who bothered to comment on anything dropped exponentially. I can't blame them. Typing on a phone is a pain in the butt, and so participation dropped, weeding out all those except the fossilized users still using actual computers and those who really, really had something they wanted to say. It was a very gradual slide, but something I noticed and discussed with contemporaries.

That was the first wave. Then came facebook and its "like" button.

One megalithic site, in the course of a few years, transformed our cultural consciousness about the way we engage with online material (among other things). You like an image? Want to thank the artist? Just click the like. No need to spend any time composing a coherent remark. You don't have time for that anyway. I do not think it's an accident that deviantArt rolled out its "favorites" button shortly after FB became a cultural phenomenon, and I watched the same thing happen there that had happened at elfwood - a plummeting in comments, critique, and true engagement in favor of an avalanche of "favorites". It's quick and easy. And of course, it's not unpleasant. If somebody likes something enough to fave or like it, that's mildly gratifying to me as an artist. I don't dislike them. But I do miss the days when there was more back-and-forth connection between me and my viewers, a sense of fan community.

The problem with the system is that it creates a certain psychological distance between a creator and the audience. The internet is a visual playground, filled with images that are so easy to view and download that many in the general public mistakenly believe that once something is posted online it is no longer copyright-protected. We can browse artwork so effortlessly that it has become a cheap consumable. And cheap consumables, like processed food, are not made by people (in our perceptions). They are made by factories. Would you write a comment on ConAgra's website telling them what a great job they do on your breakfast cereal?

It has become very easy to ignore the fact that someone poured their skill and time and passion into the images before our eyes. I saw some jerk on DevArt once leave a rant on his front page telling artists to stop thanking him for faving their work. It annoyed him. All he wanted was to collect his favorite images in a convenient, one-click process, without even having to acknowledge that there was a human being involved in their creation. He didn't even want their gratitude. He just wanted to ignore them.

Where am I going with this novel? Only this: to point out the reason it is mostly other artists who comment on comics. You are fighting a consumer culture mindset, and artists are the ones who understand what your work takes out of you. In some ways, it can be seen as an improvement - one thoughtful comment is worth about twenty comments that are just some variant of "wow! cool! love this!" etc. (Not that those are bad by any means; they're about one step up from the like button). To give you an idea of “good” engagement, I get an average of 145 visitors a day, and 5-8 comments on each page. Maybe half a dozen "regulars", and I adore them. If they are fellow artists whose work I follow, I try to reciprocate (this is tough, because my tastes in comics are very limited, and I sometimes feel bad that I just can't get into the work of someone who has faithfully engaged with my comic).

Even wildly popular comics on this site have vastly varying rates of commenting. And the most popular do not ever beg for comments, though now and then you might see an author ask a question. That can backfire, though. Sometimes I see a page like that which still has no comments, and it makes me feel really wretched for that creator, because it looks a little...pathetic. So you must factor that in before you deliberately ask for comments. If you ask, and don't get, that's even worse than not getting in the first place.

Ultimately, you have to be creating because you are driven, not for whether or not anybody else gives you feedback. You won't maintain any momentum otherwise.
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14th Dec 2017, 2:47 PM #10
Saeriellyn

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Location: Florida
Robotwin.com:I agree too. I nominate Travis to make a list of events.



Sorry if I seemed too cavalier about it. I agree it would be a big deal for a small time artist to have go to court and pay damages and fines. But fan artists still aren't thieves and it's not right to treat them that way.

Okay, to drive home the stakes:


from https://www.lib.purdue.edu/uco/CopyrightBasics/penalties.html

Why should a fan artist go to freakin' jail? If fan artists are going to jail, something is really extremely wrong with the law and the culture here. But I think this applies more to counterfeiting, not fan art. Fan art seems more in the grey area of "fair use" to me. But I do implore determined fan artists to proceed with caution, make your fan art as "transformative" as you can.

https://www.copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html


I didn't mean to sound accusatory! I just want to make sure anybody reading knew that paying a few fines doesn't necessarily equate to a few bucks and you're scot-free.

And I agree wholeheartedly about your take on fanart. My entire comic is a fanwork, and I can't sell it, have a patreon on it, or profit from it in any way, and it stinks. But it's a labor of love, and I'd rather continue it than be shut down by the copyright holder. Even so, should they one day decide to defend their copyright, I would have no choice but to take it all down or risk the above penalties.

It also sucks the way big corporations can lobby to have copyright laws changed continuously. You can thank Disney for the fact that anything as far back as Steamboat Mickey is not already in public domain. :(
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13th Dec 2017, 10:36 PM #11
Saeriellyn

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Location: Florida
Whether fan art is "ok" might depend on the judge & jury you get if you're taken to court. If you lose in court, they just call it "infringement" and have you pay up some damages, and leave it at that.


This is a pretty big deal, however, when you consider that if the court chooses to fine you, that fine is something like $25,000. Per infraction. That isn’t something to be cavalier about.

It really sucks for those who follow the rules when we see artists raking in cash by painting portraits of Disney princesses or Spider-Man and somehow getting away with it, while the company goes after some random daycare who painted a Mickey Mouse mural on the wall. But it’s not worth the gamble if you get caught.
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20th Nov 2017, 12:47 PM #12
Saeriellyn

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Registration date: 6th Feb 2015
Location: Florida
joeyballast:Fanart for Saeriellyn.

Check out The Book of Three!

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OHHHMIGOD JOEY!!!! I would like this a hundred million times. Gorgeous, thank you!
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25th Sep 2017, 2:40 PM #13
Saeriellyn

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Being guilty of adapting a work that is NOT in the public domain, I've given this a lot of thought for when I finish The Book of Three and have learned enough about this process to do something I can actually profit from.

Princess and the Goblin has actually been top of my list for a while, too. :) I've also considered Jungle Book, for the reason somebody else stated, except I think I'd be bored by the lack of female characters. Also I'd rather draw people than animals.

I'd love to do a couple of the Francis H. Burnett books. Both Secret Garden and A Little Princess would make great graphic works.

Anne of Green Gables would also be fun.

I would say Peter Pan, but Renae de Liz is already doing that and geez, who can compete.

Classic fairy tales have been done a lot and so has Greek mythology, but there's plenty of other cultural folk tales and mythologies to be played with out there. Given my current project, I will probably consider taking a crack at the Welsh Mabinogion at some point.
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10th Sep 2017, 12:19 PM #14
Saeriellyn

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Oh, that is a neat site! Book marking that one.

Geez, she's moving so much further west than was predicted. That's not a bad thing for us, but I'm going to be just a little bit pissed if we spent this last week of panic, mayhem, hype, and blowing our budget on water and batteries, for nothing.

It's kind of surreal, you all. I'm up near Orlando and right now it's just drizzling rain. No lightning and zero wind. You would never know she's out there. We've got our "panic room" set up in case of tornadoes tonight, but at this point it's not going to be nearly as bad as it looked two days ago. Not for us, anyway.

The bullshit forecast panics people too early and in all the wrong ways. I had friends pick up and scatter to the west coast because all the early models showed it going up the east or middle of the state. Now they're stuck in Tampa about to get slammed. Everyone here was ready like two days ago because the media hype made us feel like disaster was imminent, and now we've been sitting here with our boarded up windows and booze for 48 hours, literally bored and wishing the damn thing would just get here already and be over with.
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4th Sep 2017, 5:21 AM #15
Saeriellyn

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It's been a long time since I posted here. Very pleased with how this page came out, so I'm sharing. :)

Geez, I wanna cry when I think of what Disney did to these characters. >:(

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Result in thread: Draw them your way
2nd Aug 2017, 6:50 PM #16
Saeriellyn

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Bolderousness:

You ever see those forum posts you try to like, but then realize you already liked it? I think I've done that two times with your post.


Hahahaha I do that all the time.

Caught up on the other two! Woot. Apparently I am in a minority; I LIKE drawing kids. I'm good at cute and pretty. Monsters not so much.

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Result in thread: Draw them your way
1st Aug 2017, 9:32 PM #17
Saeriellyn

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Oh man this is so fun! I'm bummed I missed the first few...will try to go back and catch up.

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Result in thread: How serious are you?
1st Aug 2017, 4:20 PM #18
Saeriellyn

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What Peter said, almost.

I can't profit from the current comic because copyrights, but it's a hobby I take very seriously, because the story I'm visualizing is one I'm so passionate about. I do care about subs, but I care more about active readership; people who take the time to interact in some way. It's amazing to get, say, 154 individual reader counts in a day, but very discouraging when only four of them comment. I try not to take it personally, realizing that a lot of people feel like they just don't have anything useful to say or are on their phones where typing is a pain - but I can say that when I DO get into good fan discussion it motivates me like nothing else. I become incredibly productive because I am seeking that next "high", and if it doesn't come I'm like an addict in withdrawal. lol But even so, I'll keep going, because it's worth it to me.

Go professional? Maybe. Not with this story, but this has been a learning process, and by the time I'm done, I feel like I'll have grown enough to tackle a different one, something I could actually market and sell. But my time is limited, and given the choice between working on something else I could sell and continuing my work on Prydain - if I could only pick one, I'd stick with my hobby. It's that serious. (And of course, I rely on the fact that we're a single-income family and can spare that kind of time in the first place.)
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Result in thread: Slow comic pacing?
1st Aug 2017, 3:53 PM #19
Saeriellyn

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khkddn:People binging your archive probably won't notice slow pacing as much as people who read the updates as they come out.

Readers who are all caught up with your comic might be less inclined to rate or comment if there is not enough noteworthy content on the page. They might stop checking every single update and instead only check your comic after a couple months worth of updates are up. Which isn't bad, just a different way of reading.



This, in my experience, is the crux of the matter. I've had a reader get a little impatient with pacing at one point, but it seemed to be due more to my slowing down to one page a week after a long stretch of twice-weekly updates, plus, perhaps, a misunderstanding of what the story was actually about (they wanted more sword-and-sorcery action, and I persist in concentrating on character development and relationships - but then, I have the luxury that I'm adapting an existing book and most of my readers already know the story, so they aren't breathlessly awaiting the next big event; they're just enjoying seeing it come to life. I sometimes forget that I have a few fans who have no idea where the story is going and thus are more likely to chafe at perceived lack of progression...I feel for them, and I hate to lose any readers over it, but ultimately I'm telling this story the way I think it should be told at a gut level).

I do instinctively feel that each page should sort of stand alone as much as possible - each one serving as its own little story-within-a-story, if that makes sense. If characters are conversing, and there's a witty punchline, or a setup for a big reveal, or a cliffhanger line, or a big surprise declaration - those become my page punctuation, and I'll break up the rest of it to fit into those parameters. Sometimes I add more space to a page just to do that effectively, though it took me a long time to give up on the OCD notion that every page had to be the same size in case I wanted to print a book one day. We have the flexibility with webcomics so we might as well use it. I find that if I follow this rule, my pacing stays...consistent, at least. Some will like it and some won't, and that's fine.
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28th Jul 2017, 2:58 PM #20
Saeriellyn

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Man I'm so ready for some company to give Wacom some legit competition. And not just for their crazy price points either. Reading reviews on their new tech (I covet the mobile pro)leads me to believe they are getting sloppy, themselves, and I'm sure it's due to the fact that they ride on the strength of their brand alone. There really are no better options, so we are stuck putting up with annoying buggy things in $2k machines, assuming we can afford them in the first place. Unacceptable.

I tried a much-lauded Surface Pro from a Black Friday sale and had a similar experience. Returned it. Once you work on a Cintiq there is no going back. I'm still curious about the iPad Pro, but until Smith Micro makes an iOS app for Clip Studio, I don't think I could use it for much more than roughs and layouts. Can't justify the price for that. :/
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