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5 days ago, 3:32 PM #1
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Post the test image and ask other folks if the text is big enough for phones? It's what I did when I was first making my comic and didn't have a smartphone myself!
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5 days ago, 2:03 PM #2
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It depends on the font and the dpi you work at. e.g. "12pt" is going to look very different in the same 4000x8000 pixel image, depending on whether the image is 10"x20" at 400dpi or 5"x10" at 800dpi. Why not make a blank page with just a word balloon and see if it's easily readable on a phone? (The page needs to be the same width as actual finished pages.)
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One week ago, 2:55 PM #3
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The Letter M:I personally don't like long pages because I never know when I'll be called away, then I'll never find my spot.

Different people have different reading culture/habits. There's a reason why Naver (the Korean parent of Webtoons) updates their pro comics starting exactly at 11PM Korea time. People are expected to do their reading late at night, possibly in their bed, when there's probably gonna be not much in the way of external distractions. The reading culture is such that people set time aside specifically for webcomics. It can be a big part of their alone time.

Same thing with a lot of media, really, that you don't consume a single paragraph/ 20 second at a time. People expect to sit down for a while when they start watching a movie.

[EDIT: And they typically don't just read one comic update at 11PM in Korea. A lot of folks spend a while in a single session to catch up with all the updates for every comic that they follow, that update on that day. So yeah, definitely a 'set aside some alone time for this' kinda activity.]

THAT BEING SAID.... as someone who reads a lot of vertical scroll comics, I can still relate to the issue of "I don't know how much more I have to read to finish my "session" with this comic, and that bothers me." Not with vertical scroll specifically, though. It happens with any comic with a large enough archive. When I'm reading a physical book, at any given time I subconsciously know roughly where I am based on the thickness of the sheets before/after where I am. But I don't have that with most webcomics, and that can give me this weird anxiety.

So I acknowledge the "I don't know how much more I got aaaaAAAA" as a valid, relatable feeling. I just experience it in different contexts, I guess, because my brain switches gears and forms different expectations when reading professional vertical comics.
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23rd May 2021, 8:13 PM #4
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vaslittlecrow:New I Have Problems... up today.

They don't beat around the bush, do they! I like how their vibes are very different flavors of... untrustworthy.

###

Heart of Keol - the characters visit a very special tree.
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16th May 2021, 9:09 PM #5
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So HoK is soft of a disaster story (i.e. a story revolving around a natural disaster, not that the story itself is a disaster!). It's a sentient disaster, but still treated like a disaster than a character within the narrative. The sentient disaster is called the Queen.

There's a whole big chunk of lore about what exactly she's trying to do, how far she's willing to go to fulfill her goal, and why she wants to do it. I was never going to explain all of it in the comic. But I did have Plans for the MC to interact with some side characters who know more about the Queen.

None of those Plans are gonna come to fruition.

Because they're not actually relevant to the MC on a personal level. He does not need to know any of it to make the decisions he makes. He has personal stakes, powerful ones, and knowing more about the Queen would not change anything. He's still gonna make the same Choice.

And this is a story of him making that Choice. Thus, all that Queen stuff is irrelevant.

He (the MC) is curious about the Queen, for sure. But not curious in a story-meaningful way.
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13th May 2021, 1:10 AM #6
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Sad bois in Magical Asia
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1st May 2021, 3:30 PM #7
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I cut up my thumbnail into pieces to work on the final art too, though not for file loss protection. My "pages" are simply too big. I make a vertical scroll comic. My computer would not be happy with a 60-layer (20 of them with weird layer effects) 3000x23,000 pixel psd.

But each piece is not always a single panel. My panels often overlap over/under each other, so those are often better handled as a single file containing both (or even 3-4) overlapping panels. And when one row contains two panels -- which isn't *as* common with vertical scrolls -- I like to have the whole row in a single file, too.

Once the final art for the whole page is all done, I flatten each file (I do keep a copy of the layered file) and combine them.

But yeah, file loss? Luckily that hasn't been common enough to be a concern. I've lost some progress due to accidental Save/Save As mix-ups (absolutely horrible when it *does* happen) only like... twice throughout the entire run of HoK since November 2014?
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Result in thread: cheese
30th Apr 2021, 9:50 PM #8
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Mozzarella, buffalo ricotta, fromager d'Affinois, cheddar, pepper jack!

Buffalo mozzarella!

Goat cheese! (kinda picky here though; there is a semi-local goat farm that makes cheese from their own goats' milk, and their stuff >>>>>> store-bought stuff.)

I'm not very good with stinky cheeses, but that's okay. Got plenty of others to enjoy. :9
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30th Apr 2021, 4:39 PM #9
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Your work is automatically copyrighted to you the moment you create it. You don't need to put © [name] on it, not even your pen name.

That being said, if someone does ever steal your work, and you need to sue them... it can be hard to prove in the court that you were indeed the creator of the work. That's where the paid copyright registration comes in. It's a government-recognized proof that you made it on or before a certain date. It costs some money, but not a ton, at least in the US.

Back in the days, artists would talk about mailing a copy of your work to your own address, and never opening the envelope. That way, the stamped date would be proof that you made it on or before that date. (That's all copyright registration does, really) Problem is, everyone knows how to open a sealed envelope these days without damaging it... so it can't be used as proof. Because you could've opened it sneakily, put someone else's work in it, and then re-seal the envelope.

Practically speaking, though, would one have the money to actually hire a lawyer and sue someone? So yeah, the court stuff is more hypothetical than practical.
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19th Apr 2021, 12:26 AM #10
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hawkfoolery:tl;dr, just go absolutely ham and make comics about whatever chaotic concepts you want, it's better to make comics for yourself rather than try to appeal to a "big audience".

Not really disagreeing with you at all, just adding to it: also don't be afraid of your beloved concepts not being "weird enough."

There's a reason why you feel compelled to make it. Something that sets YOUR story apart from the mainstream stuff out there. Even if that difference isn't in-your-face, it matters to you; otherwise you wouldn't be doing all that work, day after day, year after year. Lean into that difference. Lean into what compels you.

So let your beloved characters, concepts and themes shine, no matter how weird or not weird they may seem on the surface. It will be just the right amount of weird for the right audience -- and for every single story being crafted with love, that right audience is out there. They may be few, they may not know your comic exists yet, but they're out there.
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12th Apr 2021, 7:51 PM #11
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If coloring saps that much of the joy out of your process, I'd say make the switch.

I read both color and B&W comics, as well as comics in between (spot colors, limited palette, etc). The biggest potential issue with B&W is readability, IMO. If your characters are instantly recognizable from each other, and your visuals are very clear, then you're good to go! But your characters may not be as distinct to readers as they are to you, so it might be a good idea to ask around.
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29th Mar 2021, 8:05 PM #12
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Gentle, vaguely dreamlike short stories for the mature audience -- e.g. The House of Small Cubes (although that one is an animation, not a comic).

HOWEVER, that is not my favorite genre to read. That's just the only category that will get me to check it out based on category alone. I'm more into 'gentle yet depressing longform stories about heartbreaks' -- basically the same category my own comic falls under. But that's not a genre, and I'm more likely to look at the icon & title for 0.5 second before deciding to click.
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23rd Mar 2021, 8:05 PM #13
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^ Unfortunately, black bars and dots and such are not sufficient on WT. You have to cover it with actual art, like a conveniently placed plant, some fog, or a speech balloon. That's nuts that they actually banned your whole account, though. My comic only had the one """""problematic""""" episode removed, with the rest of it being intact.
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20th Mar 2021, 3:37 PM #14
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I check whenever I'm like "it's been a while since I read that comic. I wonder if the characters finally finished that battle/ date/ dinner/ whatever?"

So I don't exactly forget forever. I mean they are sitting in my bookmarks, so I see them. But I also don't check back on any sort of a regular interval.
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20th Mar 2021, 3:18 PM #15
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Depends on the comic.

Some comics take multiple pages to show a meaningful progression, while others have a meaningful movement on each page. e.g. If it takes 3 pages for a character to open a door and move onto doing something else, then I'm not gonna read page by page.

That being said, even if it's a comic that I prefer to read in bulk, it's probably better for it to update page by page, or weekly or whatever. (DOES NOT necessarily mean "per page as it's completed." You can finish 100 pages ahead of time and just post 3 per week or whatever) Many webcomics are abandoned before they get finished. So it's good to see it being updated frequently. Shows people that it's still alive.
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20th Mar 2021, 2:12 AM #16
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I *look* at older pages fairly frequently, but it's mostly to check for outfit consistency and such. An actual reread I have done only once, early last year, I think (for reference, the comic launched in November 2014).


Spoilered for a lengthy, semi-personal tale:


I have not reread the comic in its entirety after that. I don't really need to. But maybe some day I will?
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27th Feb 2021, 2:14 AM #17
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Cyber Axl:The frustration is more of people who are very lazy with it or create mediocre stories/art and still pull in big numbers solely from name association and fandoms flocking to any new content of the series they can get.


I know what you're talking about, but I honestly don't see any "versus" in this situation. People flocking to whatever they can find within their fandom, and only within their fandom -- they were never your audience to begin with. You are not competing for their attention. You want the attention of people who are naturally into the kind of stuff you're making.

This is gross simplification, of course, since the same person can be into some well-established fandom and also into the kind of stuff you make. But you get the point. It's the same thing with genres, too. People who read only BL, they're not my comic's audience. I don't WANT their attention, not because they're icky or whatever, but because they would only be disappointed with my work. It doesn't offer what they want. I don't want a large, disappointed audience demanding something else. I want an audience, big or small, that's genuinely here for what I'm doing!

The fan comics and specific popular genres (such as BL) do have one major advantage, though. No, it's not that there are more people wanting to read those comics. It's that the people who want to read those comics KNOW HOW TO FIND THEM. What they want have very specific names/terms. That's a significant part of (though certainly not all of) advertising already DONE, built into the genre/type of work.

Whereas people who want what I make? wtf would they even search for? I like what I make, I would like to read more like mine, and *I* don't know how I would search for them!

So yeah...
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26th Feb 2021, 6:23 PM #18
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The more you work your brain, the more you learn.

Tracing in most forms involves bare minimum brain work (there are specific types of tracing that are designed to work your artistic brain, but we're not talking about those types).

Eyeballing a drawing -- replicating someone else's drawing without tracing it -- works your brain a bit, but not a ton.

Eyeballing a photo works your brain a little more, as you need to translate a photograph into your own style.

Eyeballing REAL LIFE (e.g. a real person physically in front of you, as opposed to a photo of that person) is a real brain workout. Now your brain has to translate 3-D into 2-D, which forces it to really try to understand what you're seeing. 3-D images on your computer screen are not true 3-D as perceived by your brain, because you're still looking at a flat image.

That being said, I agree with others who advocate tracing as a production speed-up tool. It's not great for improving your skills, but when it comes to pure production? Take whatever shortcuts you want, as long as you're not plagiarizing/ being dishonest about your process.
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20th Feb 2021, 2:46 AM #19
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About 20 years ago (OMG), I was reading this webcomic that is sadly no longer available anywhere. One of the MCs was a fallen angel with amnesia; much of the story revolved around the questions of who he was/is as a person, and what he had done to get kicked out of Heaven.

He was implied to have retained at least some of the terrible powers that he had as an angel, but you never got to see him use it. And as a reader, I never really looked forward to seeing his powers revealed. This was a story about WHO he was -- not WHAT he was. I could sense that if his powers were ever revealed, it would not be an exciting ass-kicking action scene. It would probably be tragic and have some serious consequences with his relationship with the other MC.

And I really liked that. After years of playing jRPGs in which the heroes saved the world, teenaged me was somehow under the naive impression that a good story was required to have those jRPG tropes. Lotsa fights. Fights with BIG stakes. A fallen/evil god probably involved. Also probably involves someone in the player party being secretly related to the said fallen god (its hidden child, its Long Lost Body Part, its ex-rival-with-amnesia, whatever). And that reveal was probably going to be The Big Plot Twist, the one that gets the player in the feels.

Turns out I didn't need ANY of those. I don't need to write about WHAT a character is. I'm gonna write about WHO they are!!!

That has been thoroughly reflected in both my current comic and my previous one. My current comic especially features some elements that COULD go the typical jRPG way (including a 'what this character is' reveal!!!), but the narrative pushes those aside to micro-focus on who the characters are, and what kind of relationships they form. Or that's the kind of a story I'm trying to write, at least. :)
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19th Feb 2021, 3:15 PM #20
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Each one of the three MCs are a mirror of my heart. The story as a whole is. I didn't set out to create a story about my own experiences and anxieties, but turns out it's what I really wanted to do deep down -- I just didn't know that until a year into making the comic. At which point I rebooted/ started over, to do this whole 'my own mirror' thing right, this time with Awareness.

Given how different the MCs are from each other, it's interesting how they're all me... XD

In addition, I'm sure every semi-important character in HoK has some part of me to some extent. I just don't necessarily know how, or to what extent.

As for sassy villains, HoK has no villains. It's not a story about some bad person trying to do bad things. It's got a sentient natural disaster on the horizon, and everybody's just trying to do what they think is the most sensible thing in the situation. They're not all on the same side at all, mind you. But nobody in the story is trying to take advantage of the situation or anything.

There are villainous people in that world, for sure. But the story doesn't focus on them. :)
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