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"What do you prioritize when reading comics art or writing?", 10 days ago, 6:28 PM #1
mightguy15

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Just curious on preferances. And please don't answer both, because both is what makes a fantastic work!

Personally for me, writing.

One*webcomic artist* makes my favorite comics and his art is very crude.



That's why typically, I tend to think comics writen by talented writers and worked on by talented artist are the best!

Not saying good artist can't be talented writers, but I have noticed a majority of the time, there is quite a large divide between each when each artist has to work vice versa.
10 days ago, 6:47 PM #2
MrTorchy

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I look for a balance between the two.

There are obvi exceptions and such, but all-in-all I'm after a balance.

I love stylized stuff for sure.
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10 days ago, 6:57 PM #3
Spelledeg
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It depends what hooked me about the comic in the first place. Comics are literally visual storytelling, at least they should be. They're a weird and beautiful place between prose and animation or film. They can borrow elements from both and have several things that don't translate into other adaptations. I love them.

Back to the Q: Im more likely to stick around for a comic whose art I fancy, if I don't like looking at it then Ill have a hard time reading it. It's a visual medium, yes it has writing backbone but the visuals are intrinsic to the whole point of comics. If I can't get past the art, even if it has a great story, or whatever, I won't stick around.

Art casts the line and writing is the hook, imo. But that should be clear in your visuals, by using the art to show and not tell. It's not this great big divide, there is one, but I dont think it's necessarily as vast as you say.
10 days ago, 7:00 PM #4
ebarie

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I tend to gravitate toward the visuals.

I know I am a better artist then writer. I strive to be better at both.
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10 days ago, 7:07 PM #5
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Probably writing, with not just webcomics I think some of my favorite visual medium stuff (movies, shows, etc) are things that feel like it's a novel brought to life faithfully. My favorite movies are adaptations of novels that tend to be really faithful, but I can find counter examples where something interested me on the aesthetic alone, definitely, but overall interest will be kept by the writing (for me)
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10 days ago, 7:10 PM #6
Fluffythespider
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Sometimes it depends on the comic, and I can't say I'd be into a comic with good writing but incomprehensible art or good art but a god awful story.


As a reader I guess I'm partial to good visuals. Maybe it's cause I do both and I find art a skill that requires more work than writing. Also I just like looking at nice art.
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10 days ago, 7:13 PM #7
Kourtney

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I always prioritize good writing over good artwork anyday, for the same reason I prefer video games with good gameplay over pretty graphics. Not saying that good illustrations aren't nice, but I'll take a comic with crappy drawings but a solid, gripping plot and well-fleshed characters woven in over a visually stunning yet poorly written piece.
10 days ago, 7:22 PM #8
Spelledeg
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Sovember:Probably writing, with not just webcomics I think some of my favorite visual medium stuff (movies, shows, etc) are things that feel like it's a novel brought to life faithfully. My favorite movies are adaptations of novels that tend to be really faithful, but I can find counter examples where something interested me on the aesthetic alone, definitely, but overall interest will be kept by the writing (for me)


Humor me, I used to hold a very similar rhetoric in art vs. writing. I'd argue that those movies and other media adaptations you like are effective not necessarily because of the strict writing, but the choice of visuals as storytelling, to push the narrative and reveal other pieces that maybe the novel didn't know it had. Because true adaptations aren't always good, because what works in prose doesn't always work directly in visual format. The method of storytelling has to shift.

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Ninja'd a bit, I think Fluffy brings good points.
10 days ago, 7:35 PM #9
Sovember

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Spelledeg:Humor me, I used to hold a very similar rhetoric in art vs. writing. I'd argue that those movies and other media adaptations you like are effective not necessarily because of the strict writing, but the choice of visuals as storytelling, to push the narrative and reveal other pieces that maybe the novel didn't know it had. Because true adaptations aren't always good, because what works in prose doesn't always work directly in visual format. The method of storytelling has to shift.

---

Ninja'd a bit, I think Fluffy brings good points.




I would definitely agree that a movie isn't guaranteed to be good just because it adapts a novel faithfully. Actually many novel to movie adaptations aren't that good, as many people would agree haha. You bring a good point about the importance of direction and I don't want to discredit the importance of things inherent to visual mediums, as opposed to writing which is a medium which has a lot more introspection, details, and such. But from personal experience I've liked a lot of movies that were based off of novels: American Psycho, Silence of the Lambs, Fight Club, The Godfather, now admittedly in all of these cases there are things omitted or changed (books have A LOT of tangents and contents obviously), but for the most part the source material is more than just a slight inspiration if that makes sense. I think overall I don't disagree with you too much, you need both, but I'd rather most of a good novel be adhered to (adding, removing, and exploring different things without breaking the story is fine and can work too though).

e: The Shining might be an exception, I did like that
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10 days ago, 7:35 PM #10
mightguy15

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MrTorchy:I look for a balance between the two.

There are obvi exceptions and such, but all-in-all I'm after a balance.

I love stylized stuff for sure.


That's true for me too, I'd be a hypocrite if I didn't say style is a big seller for me, especially high energy styles with unique character designs.
10 days ago, 7:35 PM #11
Matthew Young

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I'm sorry, but I do have to say both. There are details that can't be captured in a speech bubble, and there is dialogue that can't be communicated through artwork alone.

If the author prioritizes writing then they might be better off writing a book.
If they prioritize artwork, then they'd be better off painting or animating.
Comic books as a medium are the combined efforts of the two, therefore should be treated with equal value. So as a reader of a comic, I can only get the full intended experience by both reading the dialogue and studying the pictures.
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10 days ago, 7:37 PM #12
Eaton Pye

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I'll spend time with good art that has no writing at all, so I'll put up with a bare minimum of writing in comics if the art is attractive. Similarly, I read books without pictures, so if the writing is good enough, I can tolerate some pretty bad art. However, the worse one is, the better the other has to be to keep my interest.

I think the truth is that the vast majority of comics, and not just on the web, have a lot of weaknesses in both of these areas- the trick is finding a mix that gets the job done. If you compare the average panel art to 'real art,' it usually comes up short. If you compare the quality of the writing to that in good novels, it generally comes up short. But, working together, they can still be very effective in good storytelling.

Judged by the standards of non-comic art, or non-comic writing, I think that what most people mean by "good" in comics is "good enough," or "Not seriously repellent." And that's fine, because what we need the art or the writing to do is different in comics than it is in novels, illustrations, movies, animations and so on.

What the right mix of elements is depends on the nature of the product. A daily four-panel with clever writing and funny jokes can get by with stick figures. I am not sure a stick-figure horror comic would be possible- the character of the art would make it, at best funny rather than scary or creepy, no matter what the writing was like.

All that being said, I need some kind of extra motivation to check out a comic with art I don't care for.
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10 days ago, 7:46 PM #13
mightguy15

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Matthew Young:I'm sorry, but I do have to say both. There are details that can't be captured in a speech bubble, and there is dialogue that can't be communicated through artwork alone.

If the author prioritizes writing then they might be better off writing a book.
If they prioritize artwork, then they'd be better off painting or animating.
Comic books as a medium are the combined efforts of the two, therefore should be treated with equal value. So as a reader of a comic, I can only get the full intended experience by both reading the dialogue and studying the pictures.


That's fine, it doesn't have to be one or the other, I was just asking in essence of personal preference. If you don't mind me rambling for a bit, the biggest reason I don't like series like Dragonball and Fairy Tale isn't because of the art at all. I don't like the inconsistent writing thought don't get me wrong, I still have a lot of respect for those series.

Meanwhile, manga like Jojo or Sun-Ken rock......man the art in both those comics are so mesmerizing I don't think story would matter to me. I would just want to look at it all day.

I'm actually ashamed to admit this, but some of my biggest influences are artist who aren't really well known for their writing. God, I cry every-time I wake up every morning and can't draw like this........



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Merged Doublepost:

Eaton Pye:All that being said, I need some kind of extra motivation to check out a comic with art I don't care for.


Strong point my man. You put into words what I was thinking, but didn't really know how to convey it.

Edit: Honestly, now that I think about it, I think the biggest reason I like writing more is exactly this, when I fall upon a work that gives me that motivation despite not offering a visual medium to build off of.
10 days ago, 8:06 PM #14
joeyballast
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Depends on the kind of comic. If it's long form narrative, art comes first for me. There's a few comics where I check for updates just for the pretty art and don't bother actually reading the page. If it's gag a day, then the art can be non existent.
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10 days ago, 8:39 PM #15
kyrtuck

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I tend to focus more on the plot and characters. Art is secondary for me :3
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10 days ago, 9:02 PM #16
ShaRose49

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Writing is more important. I loooove art, but without great story...it’s gonna bore me after awhile.
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10 days ago, 9:27 PM #17
MrTorchy

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mightguy15:
Meanwhile, manga like Jojo or Sun-Ken rock......man the art in both those comics are so mesmerizing I don't think story would matter to me. I would just want to look at it all day.




I couldn't agree more.

At a certain point, it's all serious eye candy.
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10 days ago, 9:37 PM #18
Eaton Pye

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ShaRose49:Writing is more important. I loooove art, but without great story...it’s gonna bore me after awhile.


What constitutes 'great story?' When I see mainstream comics, I don't see a lot of great stories. They tend toward repetitive rehashing of the same weary tropes, with minor variations. Web comics? I haven't really read very many far enough to see if there's a great story because either I can't get past the art, or the setting is not doing it for me- for instance, something based on D&D games, Pokemon or any corporate intellectual property is going to shut me down pretty quick. Maybe someone capable of writing 'great stories' is going to do it in the Pokiverse, but my tendency is to think not. I feel like there has to be some super ultra mega meta important reason to piggyback on someone else's creative work like that, otherwise it's a mark of laziness or inability to build your own characters, etc. Obviously a huge portion of the internet disagrees with me, but there it is.

So, I see a vast amount of fanfic of various kinds, and I see people, especially really young people, rehashing their media inputs in slightly less recognizable ways, and this is all very fine as an exercise, but I don't think it qualifies as 'great stories.' Stories that stand on their own feet seem pretty rare to me in web comics- and stories good enough on their own to overcome bad art, even rarer.

So what are the criteria for 'great stories' that you use?
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10 days ago, 9:44 PM #19
deo101
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To be completely honest, I need good art to read a comic. It doesn't need to be super polished or colored or anything like that, but it needs to be clear. I can get past unclear and confusing writing way before I can get past unclear art. (I've actually been recommended comics and had to stop reading cause I could not tell what was going on.)
If I can't tell who is speaking or what a character is doing or where anyone is, then I can't read it.

Sometimes a comic is super pretty and a lot of people like it and I just can't understand what's happening :/
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10 days ago, 10:06 PM #20
ShaRose49

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Eaton Pye:What constitutes 'great story?' When I see mainstream comics, I don't see a lot of great stories. They tend toward repetitive rehashing of the same weary tropes, with minor variations. Web comics? I haven't really read very many far enough to see if there's a great story because either I can't get past the art, or the setting is not doing it for me- for instance, something based on D&D games, Pokemon or any corporate intellectual property is going to shut me down pretty quick. Maybe someone capable of writing 'great stories' is going to do it in the Pokiverse, but my tendency is to think not. I feel like there has to be some super ultra mega meta important reason to piggyback on someone else's creative work like that, otherwise it's a mark of laziness or inability to build your own characters, etc. Obviously a huge portion of the internet disagrees with me, but there it is.

So, I see a vast amount of fanfic of various kinds, and I see people, especially really young people, rehashing their media inputs in slightly less recognizable ways, and this is all very fine as an exercise, but I don't think it qualifies as 'great stories.' Stories that stand on their own feet seem pretty rare to me in web comics- and stories good enough on their own to overcome bad art, even rarer.

So what are the criteria for 'great stories' that you use?


Great story = characters who feel human, with ongoing arcs in their development, thought provoking lore and themes

Maybe you’re just reading spinoff webcomics? Cause I seem to have found all kinds of great stories online. I don’t read fanfics. And I would agree that a lot of mainstream stuff is getting old, but every once in while they do something new with it that actually makes sense and they don’t just focus on the action and politics blowing up in your face. But yeah, it sure is hard to find these days. Indie comics/movies for LIFE!!
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