Comic Fury Webcomic Hosting - Action Scene Tutorials

You are not logged in. Log in, Register, More info
Forum > Webcomic & Art discussion > Action Scene Tutorials
Pages: [1] [2]

"Action Scene Tutorials", 8 days ago, 8:28 PM #1
BlueDragon

User avatar
Posts: 783
Registration date: 7th Jan 2015
Location: Missouri
So...I am terrible with action scenes.

I am also pretty busy, and haven't had time to do a lot of research. I would like to see if anyone hear has any suggestions for free action tutorials. I do don't digital art, but I welcome anyone to share those, too, in case others find them useful :3

I have been trying to look at some of my own manga for inspiration, but they're just not doing it. I can look at it, but I can't process how to DO it.

Also welcome: tips, tricks, whatever you think will help. Or, if you have a method that helps you, or any comments about your own journey, I'd like to see what can be compiled here. I'm simply awful and it's getting me down, so I'm asking for a bit of help XD Thanks to anyone who shares anything. And...if/when I get time, I might take the time to look some up myself and share, too.
_______________________
8 days ago, 8:49 PM #2
TheStrangerous

User avatar
Posts: 843
Registration date: 12th Jun 2018
Location: El Inframundo
Forgive my lack of proper nomenclature knowledge:

GHOSTING
image

Wait, there are multiple Spidermen clones in one panel?
NO! It's the same one Spiderman, doing different motions in one panel. Kinda like animation, but still.
_______________________
image
8 days ago, 10:15 PM #3
Cooke
it's pronounced "Kooky"
User avatar
Posts: 2084
Registration date: 4th Sep 2016
Location: Ireland
Don't know any tutorials off hand but panel breaks are a good way of drawing action scenes. Also, things jumping out of the page by way of foreshortening. Dynamic poses. Like if a character is throwing a kick, their whole body is in the movement. And instead of drawing it from the side for example, have them kicking their opponent at you the reader.

Clarity is also helpful so the reader knows what's going on. Leading them around the page by the way characters are performing action sequences is good too. Using vanishing points for emphasis on speed.


TheStrangerous:GHOSTING
Wait, there are multiple Spidermen clones in one panel?
NO! It's the same one Spiderman, doing different motions in one panel. Kinda like animation, but still.


Used the same technique on one of my pages too.
_______________________
8 days ago, 10:21 PM #4
BlueDragon

User avatar
Posts: 783
Registration date: 7th Jan 2015
Location: Missouri
Thank you both! I have tried a bit of ghosting for tomorrow's page...I see now I've not used enough characters...

I think I need to also work bigger. I was drawing the figures pretty small. :/
_______________________
One week ago, 4:34 AM #5
Amazing Chris Godbey
formerly DrFurball
User avatar
Posts: 301
Registration date: 16th Jan 2015
Location: Paradise City, where the grass is green and the girls are pretty
Something that I've found to help is to not show the impact itself, but to show the follow-through.
The reader's mind will fill in the motion automatically.

Case in point, this famous page by Jack "The King" Kirby:


The only exceptions in that example are Batroc tripping Captain America, and Cap retaliating with a chop to Batroc's neck, but even then, it's still a split-second after the impact, because we can see the victim of the strike starting to react.
_______________________
image
One week ago, 4:39 AM #6
smbhax

User avatar
Posts: 1403
Registration date: 19th Nov 2009
Location: WA, USA
"How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way" goes through various means of showing action in comics, in great detail; you might find that book helpful.

As with most things though it ultimately comes down to practicing it a lot!
_______________________
image
One week ago, 10:22 AM #7
Kevtrev

User avatar
Posts: 808
Registration date: 31st Oct 2015
Location: Netherlands
I can only share where my own inspiration comes from: Akira Toriyama's speed lines, timing, and panel layouts that guide the eye. He is an absolute master at this.

But just looking at it isn't enough; you have to see and understand what he's doing, which is where this video comes in: (you don't have to watch the whole thing, just 10:14-12:00)

It goes into more detail and hopefully that'll help you on your way. It certainly helped me :D
_______________________
image
The comic itself is not in color. New page every Tuesday!
One week ago, 10:52 AM #8
dpat57
Oh Yeah!
User avatar
Posts: 2058
Registration date: 14th Oct 2010
Location: Caledonia
Keep them off balance, leaning this way and that, falling back, surging forward, never standing upright and just extending their arm to punch. If a punch lands then the henchman's head snaps back and he's propelled backwards. Feet don't stay on the ground.
_______________________
image
One week ago, 3:06 PM #9
MissElaney

User avatar
Posts: 738
Registration date: 26th Nov 2016
Location: WOKELAND, ACTIN HARD
You want to -- all of you -- add "lines of action" and "staging" to your drawing vocabulary so that you can look up tutorials about 'em.

Lines of action are arcing, fluid lines that guide the sense of a character's movement. They are the primary tool you will want to use in creating action scenes. So much so that the word action is in the name.

Here are some great links/free resources:
Simplicity, Appeal, Line of Action, a lot of blabbity blah and Jordi Bernet
Line Of Action On Solid Objects
Richard Scarry: Line Of Action
More On Line Of Action

Next is staging, which is essentially how you choose to arrange subjects/items within the frame in order to add more drama or a particular mood to a composition. Your choice of angles, where everything is in relation to one another.

Staging And How It Affects Mood And Drama
Basic Staging Principles (Pt 1)]
Basic Staging Principles (Pt 2)

Lastly here is a good article that talks about evaluating motion lines (or "speed lines") versus "blood and posture" (e.g. staging and line of action) together or exclusively: Blood And Posture
_______________________
One week ago, 4:16 PM #10
BlueDragon

User avatar
Posts: 783
Registration date: 7th Jan 2015
Location: Missouri
Yes! Thank you guys! I'm going to see if I can find that How to Draw the Marvel Way at the library. (I <3 the library XD)

The video is going to helpful right away as have the drawing samples! Thank you all!

@MissElaney

Wow! I'm super stoked to check out those resources!! And thank you for sharing the vocab so it's easier too look up! Sometimes I try to find something, but the problem is I can't describe it accurately!

I'm hoping to get through some of these this weekend :D (or sooner, if I can!)
_______________________
6 days ago, 7:06 AM #11
Marcel

User avatar
Posts: 69
Registration date: 27th Jan 2018
Location: Eugene, Oregon
I've looked at your recent pages and yes, they don't have the impact that they should. I'm impressed that you're mature enough to acknowledge your shortcomings and ask for help. That's how we improve, after all. Ditto the suggestions above. Something I'd like to add is when you're showing conflict between two characters they should be shown in opposition. If a character is speaking it will be shown facing the viewer and the other character will be showing its back to the viewer standing in the foreground. Move around your camera views, and when a character shoots a magic spell have it fire towards the viewer in 3D. Look at action scenes you admire and feel free to copy the poses onto your characters. Steal like an artist is a phrase that I've heard. You're good now and you'll only get better!
_______________________
image
6 days ago, 1:52 PM #12
Socratatus

User avatar
Posts: 187
Registration date: 9th Aug 2019
Location: [img]https://i.imgur.com/g lLuHPy.png[/img]
BlueDragon:So...I am terrible with action scenes.

I am also pretty busy, and haven't had time to do a lot of research. I would like to see if anyone hear has any suggestions for free action tutorials. I do don't digital art, but I welcome anyone to share those, too, in case others find them useful :3

I have been trying to look at some of my own manga for inspiration, but they're just not doing it. I can look at it, but I can't process how to DO it.

Also welcome: tips, tricks, whatever you think will help. Or, if you have a method that helps you, or any comments about your own journey, I'd like to see what can be compiled here. I'm simply awful and it's getting me down, so I'm asking for a bit of help XD Thanks to anyone who shares anything. And...if/when I get time, I might take the time to look some up myself and share, too.


I`m probably crap at explaining it, but...

I write the scene first, then...

1. I set the room (box) I`ll draw in. Knowing where everything is.
2. Place the characters amd move them mentally in a 3D way in my head. Then I make simple sketches knowing where everyone should go.
3. You know those story boards? I just do a step by step pic on spare paper.
4. I change the scenes (still skteching) until it looks exciting, but also not too confusing to the viewer unless i want it to be.
5. Then draw.
_______________________
image

6 days ago, 6:01 PM #13
BlueDragon

User avatar
Posts: 783
Registration date: 7th Jan 2015
Location: Missouri
Marcel:I've looked at your recent pages and yes, they don't have the impact that they should. I'm impressed that you're mature enough to acknowledge your shortcomings and ask for help. That's how we improve, after all. Ditto the suggestions above. Something I'd like to add is when you're showing conflict between two characters they should be shown in opposition. If a character is speaking it will be shown facing the viewer and the other character will be showing its back to the viewer standing in the foreground. Move around your camera views, and when a character shoots a magic spell have it fire towards the viewer in 3D. Look at action scenes you admire and feel free to copy the poses onto your characters. Steal like an artist is a phrase that I've heard. You're good now and you'll only get better!


I'm so glad you mentioned this! I think...composition is something I need to try to focus on, too. I'm brainstorming some ideas to fix the last few pages...I was trying to think it was better to have the antagonist's back to us facing the other character. This comment is super helpful! I *think* I have an idea of how I want to re-work the page.


Socratatus:I`m probably crap at explaining it, but...

I write the scene first, then...

1. I set the room (box) I`ll draw in. Knowing where everything is.
2. Place the characters amd move them mentally in a 3D way in my head. Then I make simple sketches knowing where everyone should go.
3. You know those story boards? I just do a step by step pic on spare paper.
4. I change the scenes (still skteching) until it looks exciting, but also not too confusing to the viewer unless i want it to be.
5. Then draw.


I think I get what you're saying. I'm starting to think that I need to also fix how I thumbnail. I was reading Framed Ink...and I like what he's saying but I'm having trouble (and not one can help me with this XD) comprehending how to translate that to me. I might need to check out some animation storyboards, too then?

I am going to try to set aside some time this weekend (I am finally catching up a bit and having time for side projects...so studying is something I need to do more of.)

Thanks for sharing your process!
_______________________
6 days ago, 6:14 PM #14
mightguy15

User avatar
Posts: 1236
Registration date: 24th Sep 2018
Location: Imagination town
YEEES, I CAN BE HELPFUL!!!

This is the thing I have dedicated the earlier half of my life learning, as my favorite mangaka have been huge inspirations to me and they all draw combat manga.

I'll use bullet points.

1. Understand the feel you desire to create for the scene.

In instances of combat, it is not a requirement to remain proportionate. This can be demonstrated by the work of my favorite mangaka Yusuke Murata.

The display isn't so much how well you can draw the scene, it's more about how well your image can convey what's happening. For instance, refer to the below image, what is being conveyed?

image

Your assumption might be that Saitama is about to K.O. genos with a very powerful one hit kill blow (this is correct by the way). The reason Yusuke Murata drew Saitama so large was to show the scale of the attack, a larger than life strike that made Genos tiny in comparison.


In those instances, proportion doesn't particularly matter when you are trying to convey a feeling. If it is a scene where an angry character is about to K.O. his poor opponent, even the experts agree that experimenting is fair game!



Now in the instance of a 1v1 fight containing two combatants of similar capablitly, we go to another of my favorite illistrators, Eiichro Oda.


image


In instances like these, an understanding of proportion is necessary in a way. typically involving the victim of the punch being thrusted into the camera with the extent of their injuries displayed to show the power behind the punch of his opponent. However, since the characters are scaled down, Luffys attack does not seem as assertive as saitamas. The character luffy punched recovered and continued fighting, thus this is displayed with his expression as he is being struck, where we see him angrily trying to retain his focus so he can stay in the fight.

Ill include a part 2 after I gather some more images
6 days ago, 7:08 PM #15
deo101
pungent
User avatar
Posts: 437
Registration date: 26th Sep 2017
Location: California
I find this tutorial very helpful

I also like the "Wecc" Idea which I got from a youtuber I don't recall:
Weight
The weight of the characters and the impact of their attacks
-enviornmental response will show this kinda thing
we have to feel the hits. Line of action and all that

Enviornment
Where are they? if its an arena it'll just be a one on one test of skill, but if you put them somewhere (like a store, a city scene) all of a sudden you can and should incorporate elements of the environment into a fight. This makes fight scenes more exciting

Composition
MissElaney got this one great I don't have anything to add

Character
What are their skills?
(If they can fly, probably should be flying unless they cant for some reason)
what are their personalities?
(cowards might hide or try to reason)
what is their goal in the scene?
_______________________
If you see me on the forums im probably procrastinating.
image
6 days ago, 7:16 PM #16
TheStrangerous

User avatar
Posts: 843
Registration date: 12th Jun 2018
Location: El Inframundo
I don't know why, but imagining it as if I'm playing a video game helps.

But it's weird controlling 2 characters at once...

_______________________
image
5 days ago, 9:36 PM #17
Panda Cop

User avatar
Posts: 13
Registration date: 9 days ago
Location: J City
Not sure what kind of action you want. Actually knowing how to beat somebody up / learning martial arts is a good way to understand body mechanics.

I often think about martial arts movies and fighting/wrestling

Maybe some pro wrestling also

You mentioned not liking digital art

I made a motion comic all just pencil and paper. Its like 80% fighting

Ill post the youtube link here i hope this doesnt get me in trouble for advertising

Feel free to take any concepts or copy any scenes.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3llVODuPfHtN70i9gKKsg/videos?view=0&sort=dd&shelf_id=0
4 days ago, 3:25 AM #18
BlueDragon

User avatar
Posts: 783
Registration date: 7th Jan 2015
Location: Missouri
^Not a bad idea looking at films with good fight scenes to see how they're choreographed. Thanks for the suggestion! I will also check that video out when I start looking at these responses in detail this weekend :3 I don't know about the forum rules, but I don't mind checking other artist's stuff out--that's why I'm part of an artist community ;) Also Megamaster had a Youtube drawing thread you might want to check out.


mightguy15:YEEES, I CAN BE HELPFUL!!!


Yaaaaas! Those are some really good samples! *O* I wish I could do that...I hope to be able to do something comparable. See these are things I picture in my mind...and then I draw it and it looks like sh*t XD It's going to get better. It's going to get better! Because I said so XD

deo101:I find this tutorial very helpful

I also like the "Wecc" Idea which I got from a youtuber I don't recall:
Weight


Enviornment

Composition


Character

(I'm just cutting stuff so my response isn't too long)

Thank you so much for this! I'm looking forward to studying up on this over the weekend (and uh...more than just the weekend X'D)

TheStrangerous:I don't know why, but imagining it as if I'm playing a video game helps.

But it's weird controlling 2 characters at once...

Video

Okay, that video is just awesome buy itself, but the idea of looking at videogames is something I didn't even think of! I mean, it might not help with all the composition, but definitely with moves and flow!

____________

I also finally found the time to find a couple videos I want to watch more closely. I'm just sharing them as part of my preliminary search.

_______________________
4 days ago, 3:59 AM #19
The Letter M
🎀Official CF Wine Tester🎀
User avatar
Posts: 3666
Registration date: 28th Nov 2012
Location: Australia
I like to think of the geography and make sure it's clear where the combatants are. The captain america fight further up is ok...but it's just taking place in a panel of colour. They certainly wouldn't do that anymore.
_______________________
imageimageimageimage
4 days ago, 6:09 PM #20
ShaRose49

User avatar
Posts: 1241
Registration date: 27th Jul 2018
Location: Canada
I’m not very good at action scenes either, I’m still so new at them. (I’m actually in the middle of one right now, and I already am disliking a panel that I drew). So far, one thing that’s helped me is to take inspiration from, and pay attention to fights in my fav comics and cartoons, even taking screenshots of certain shots to get a better look at them, and then implementing a few of the cool moves or angles into my own fight.

Another huge help is storyboarding—the hardest thing for me when drawing action scenes is figuring out how the characters get from point A to point B, in a way that makes sense and is also exciting. Rough storyboarding helps me get a clearer picture of what I’m going to be drawing before I draw it, so I’m not just sitting there like:

image

Merged Doublepost:

TheStrangerous:I don't know why, but imagining it as if I'm playing a video game helps.

But it's weird controlling 2 characters at once...

Video


This would make it more fun, I’ll try to imagine this too
Forum > Webcomic & Art discussion > Action Scene Tutorials
Pages: [1] [2]