Forum > Webcomic & Art discussion > I can't stop subscribing to webcomics
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11 days ago, 11:02 AM #21
mightguy15

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Timishayd:I know how you feel but honestly, I don't blame the authors. I mean, life happens.

When I had Tapas installed on my smartphone, I was following a good webcomic that had an engaging concept (about an immortal dude and a chick who are a couple and the story jumps or goes back in time depending how the story is going on). Then the author stopped updating for a few months and after all that time, suddenly made an announcement that the comic won't be updated anymore because they were having depression issues. Reason was that the only thing they cared about was making more pages for the webcomic and they were pushing away the people who they loved. It was sad and eye-opening at the same time.

Talking about Tapas, there I followed less than 10 webcomics because everything was either slice of life or comics that were going nowhere.


Well, no offense, but this is an entirely different situation than what I was addressing.

My criticism was directed toward people who abandon their projects and never return without an explanation. It is unfortunate that happened to the author of the series you were subscribed to, and it is commendable that despite that he eventually came back to let everyone know why he stopped.

Not like I have anything against people who don't do this though. I'm just saying the curtsy is something to be appreciated.


Also, yeah same here when it comes to Tapas. Honestly, some of these slice of life comics are pretty good! I love Millineals life, Murrz (webtoons), my giant boyfriend, and behind the gif. But a lot of them are pretty bad and low effort. Sometimes I feel like a lot of those artist just care about getting the money. Nothing against people trying to earn a living, but I can only tolerate jokes I could have put out in an afternoon for so long and a lot of those comics have hundreds of pages you have to cull through. Not even to mention slice of life pretty much dominates the featured series.
"I followed 2k comics, and this is how I do it", 11 days ago, 1:51 PM #22
xwindows
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Timishayd:I think it is becoming an addiction, haha. But suddenly I see comics that look so good, I can't help myself.

Now the only problem is to find time to read them.

Anyway, does this happen to you? Subscribing to lots of comics knowing you barely have time to read? Probably it's just a temporary problem because I'm new here. Hope to catch up soon to all the comics I subscribed to.

Relatable for some part, but for me, it is not exactly a temporary problem as I have 1100+ comics on my RSS newsreader, cumulated from a decade of reading webcomics. (It actually used to be 2400+, before Smackxodus crashed in)

But with that many comics in my list, it entail some management to make them more comprehensible...

In my case, there are multiple list of webcomics: to-read list, preliminary reading list, and regular reading list. These are maintained in huge text files, while the real updates are tracked by newsreader.

The to-read list is like a shopping wishlist; which mean I haven't yet to follow these comics, but they passed my eyes and looks interesting; so I bookmarked them here.

^ I will also revisit this list when I'm looking for new comics to follow: where I would pick, do a full binge read, and start following it if it looks promising (moving it to the one of the two next list). Comics that failed this will be dropped from the list.

The preliminary reading list is a list of comics I have started tracking in my newsreader, but their story weren't already going far enough for me to decide if it was up to my alley. If it progressed to certain point that I'm sure I like where it is going, I'll move it to the next list.

^ If it turned out not to be the case, or it stopped updating for 1+ year; I'll stop following it and drop it from the list.

The regular reading list is a "permanent" list of comics I track in my newsreader. Comics don't usually got kicked off this list; unless the story permanently went a way that I really dislike, the author moved it to a platform that I can't read (e.g. LINE Webtoon or NHN Smack Jeeves), or the author ended up paywalling it.

^ I would not stop following comic on my regular reading list even that it appeared to stop updating. I have personally rediscovered few webcomics that came back from 2-3 year hiatus this way.

For the comics that actually ended up reaching "finish" line, I would mark it as "finished" on my reading list (also move to regular reading list if it wasn't already there); then take it off my newsreader after some grace period.

-----

Apart from the written list and state categorization (new, unread, idle, broken) on newsreader, I also have mental subcategories for comics I follow (whether preliminary or permanent)...

1. Should-read-every-update
2. Holy cow! When was the last time I saw this comic updates!? Must read it NOW!
3. Interesting, but only read occasionally
4. Hold it, wait for 30+ unread pages first
5. I remembered this, but I'm not in a mood to continue reading it right now
6. What's this comic is about again? Might re-read it if in a mood
7. Not sure if this is still my thing anymore. If I could find a time to read it, I might be finally able to unfollow it for good
8. No new page for so long time

Only subcategories 1-3 are comics that I'd consider that I "actively" follow at a point in time.

The usual reason that comic enter subcategory #4 for me is a very high buildup of tension, which I waited so that I could read the dramatic part in one go; another less-common reason is reboot, which I wait to make sure that I don't waste my time reading a story that got caught in a reboot loop.

mightguy15:It is very disrespectful to your audience to simply abandon your project

I agree, but only in the case where I actually paid for that story (e.g. a printed manga series I follow).

I figured that in many cases of webcomics, it could be chalked up to the reason @Kyo mentioned i.e. if the abandonment was passive, the update would just stop; but when the author "took initiative" to stop, then you would get an announcement, or better, a proper cut-short closure. The first case happened much more often.

When a free-to-read webcomic enter "stalled" status in my reading list (no update for a year), I thought "Oh, that's shame". But apart from marking it as such on my list, I will not press any further. They are not doing this in professionally anyway; real life always comes first, and not always in a way they expect, so I won't take this against them.

^ To be honest, I'm more frustrated with actively-posting authors that do platform shopping and left webcomic sites by stop posting without notice (then go on posting on other platform).

With the rough statistics I saw in my newsreader and my reading list, I could tell that majority of webcomics I followed, ended up stopping rather than reaching finish line; so I rather took more effort to congratulate authors once they actually finish their comics instead.
11 days ago, 2:47 PM #23
marcorossi

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Registration date: 9th Dec 2019
Location: Italy
Wow I tought I subscribed to a lot of webcomics but it seems I'm just a noob!

My main problem is that I generally subscribe to a comic only after I finished the already published pages.

Sometimes I subscribed to a comic before reading all the pages, but then when a new page is published, I've problems going back to the point I was so I sorta lose the drive to read the comic (this happens when there are a lot of pages already published).

On the other hand, sometimes I start reading a comic, don't subscribe because I didn't reach the end, and then forget the comic, so maybe it's better to subscribe anyway.

---

On the topic of comics that are too ambitious and then end abruptly in the middle:

When I was a teen, I read a lot of comics from the italian publisher Bonelli, that usually have single episodes around 100 pages long (like in a series of detective stories with each episode being 100 pages long and the episodes being mostly unrelated, but with the same protagonist and sidekick).
When I tried to write plots for comics, I initially wanted to write short stories, around 20 pages long, because drawing is long and a 100 pages story looked as too much for me.
But then I wasn't able to write stories so short. Years later I drew and published my first webcomic, that was 100 pages long. I think I'm just used to that kind of lenght and can't think in different terms.
Then I read the book "save the cat" (that is a famous book about screenwtiting, for those who didn't know), and tried to write a 20 pages story with that framework. I had to increase the page number to 32, and while I managed to write and draw it I had the feeling that I was compressing too much and skipping some things.
Later I began the comic I'm drawing curently, again in the STC framework. It will probably be 280 pages long (more or less). Since I draw a page a week or less it is a lot of time! But it seems to me that it is just my natural level of compression of the story, I'd have to force my style to do a shorter story.
In this situation it is possible that people start a story in the way that seems most natural for them and then for one reason or the other stop in the middle.
The point is that most of us are used to read commercially produced comics that, by their nature, are quite long, because they are produced by professionals who do this as a job 40h/week or more, in a team, and because succesful series tend to be prolonged as long as they can sell, so we are attuned to a narrative rythm that is impossible for a hobbyst.
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11 days ago, 9:08 PM #24
Timishayd

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Registration date: 22nd Nov 2019
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mightguy15:Well, no offense, but this is an entirely different situation than what I was addressing.

My criticism was directed toward people who abandon their projects and never return without an explanation. It is unfortunate that happened to the author of the series you were subscribed to, and it is commendable that despite that he eventually came back to let everyone know why he stopped.

Not like I have anything against people who don't do this though. I'm just saying the curtsy is something to be appreciated.


I know! Yeah, it's kind of disappointing when they suddenly stop without an explanation. This may be because of shame. The ones I know who have made some kind of announcement after dropping their creations cite this as the reason why they didn't say anything to begin with. But then again, they're only humans. And the example of manga publishers, I don't think it applies here because they're professionals (like xwindows pointed out). Most of webcomic creators are beginners or young people who work on their projects on their free time (and usually end up with different aspirations and move on to other stuff).

Not saying that what you said is untrue. It is rude and disappointing. However, I don't have any ill sentiment towards them and try to understand why they go this route.


mightguy15:Also, yeah same here when it comes to Tapas. Honestly, some of these slice of life comics are pretty good! I love Millineals life, Murrz (webtoons), my giant boyfriend, and behind the gif. But a lot of them are pretty bad and low effort. Sometimes I feel like a lot of those artist just care about getting the money. Nothing against people trying to earn a living, but I can only tolerate jokes I could have put out in an afternoon for so long and a lot of those comics have hundreds of pages you have to cull through. Not even to mention slice of life pretty much dominates the featured series.


It's not like I hate slice of life, I read some of them too but I was mainly referring to the ones who are like three or four panels (kind of like newspaper strips) that doesn't have a concrete story or continuity or have relatable moments. After the first fifteen strips it feels like they have ran out of ideas or feel like is the same thing we have seen before.

The ones I liked there and can remember right now was Woman's Best Friend and NON-NON (paid and free respectively). Last one was very creative and hilarious! But with a few cringe-inducing moments.

xwindows:^ To be honest, I'm more frustrated with actively-posting authors that do platform shopping and left webcomic sites by stop posting without notice (then go on posting on other platform).


Never had this issue but sounds truly upsetting. Also, I like your system, methodic and neat.

marcorossi:Then I read the book "save the cat" (that is a famous book about screenwtiting, for those who didn't know), and tried to write a 20 pages story with that framework.


You, Sir, have sparked my curiosity. I'll add that book to my wishlist.

And everything you said is on point. We always hear/read: "Start with something short", but as you said, we are bombarded with long and ambitious projects that we have no idea how to make a short story.
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11 days ago, 11:21 PM #25
mitchellbravo

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mightguy15: But I can't just see myself abandoning my series at all, and especially to the extent where I would disappear off the internet without an explanation for years on end.


Neither did I, until it almost happened. My characters, story, world which made up so much of my spare-time thinking for half a decade took a back seat to dumb brokebrains anxious repetitive thinking, and felt tedious and trivial to think about. I kept trying to reignite that flame but there was too much static in my brain from other stuff going on.

A lot of the stories I've really got hooked on were either done by writers who explicitly shared that they had mental health issues themselves, or where like, I know you can't judge a book by its cover and all but you could kind of tell based on the sincerity of the subject matter or something about the presentation that the creator was going through some stuff. You'd be surprised in the right (or I guess wrong) mindset how easy it is to visit your host site less and less often, post less and less often, think about your comic less and less often until it all just kind of slips away and becomes a part of a life you no longer live.

I'm not saying it doesn't suck for readers who are invested, I'm just saying it usually sucks more for the person, and in general disgreeing on the idea of "owing." There's TV shows I've watched and really enjoyed but partway through the series it ends up sucking. i don't regret watching the first few seasons, you take risks every day with the way you choose to spend the minutes of your life and I don't regret spending them engaging in something really potent or fun that ends abruptly. The fun still counts even if the ending doesn't.
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Forum > Webcomic & Art discussion > I can't stop subscribing to webcomics
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