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"Page Sizing", 12 days ago, 9:45 PM #1
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hey im
back

Yeah I'm actually deciding to to start a comic here. What's some suggested page sizes other people use? I'm gonna test out a few sizes to see what's comfortable, but knowing what other people use may give me something that looks nicer.
12 days ago, 9:58 PM #2
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basically don't upload anything unspeakably huge that doesn't fit on the screen. personally, I don't think I ever went farther than 800-ish pixels for width, and 1k-ish for height. (width is definitely more important though)

watch out for file size too! I always remain under 1 MB, and most of my pages seem to be in the 400-800 KB range.
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11 days ago, 12:14 AM #3
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It might be helpful to look at some pretty successful webcomics (Hiveworks would be a good place to look since their comics are curated) and see what aspect ratio their pages are made at. Pay attention to how big they are on the page and how much scrolling feels natural.

You can always make something smaller without too much trouble, but upscaling your art has the risk of looking noticably fuzzy, so my best advice would be to work big and resize.

Also, considering if you might ever want to print your comic will make you thank yourself in the future. It can be nice to have a physical product of your love and labor even if you don't plan to sell it. Looking into standard graphic novel or comic book sizes would also be good.

When working digitally, don't bother with less than 300DPI if you can help it. I personally scan all my art (I line traditionally) at that quality because I'm scared of the image looking bad and I'm overcompensating lol

When working traditionally, it's ideal to work a bit bigger than you intend to print. I look like a bit of a hypocrite since my now mostly defunct webcomic is drawn very irreverently in a decently small sketchbook, but I started that going on six years ago so it's not how I would work if I were to do it today!
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11 days ago, 12:19 PM #4
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Draw comics on grains of rice!

11 days ago, 3:23 PM #5
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I do the max width of 950 pixels. It seems to work out pretty well. :) before that, I save my pages at about 2500 pixels. It's only the versions for Comicfury that I make smaller.

Keep in mind, if you work traditionally scan in at at least 300dpi. This will help the image retain its resolution/detail/quality once shrunk down.
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11 days ago, 3:43 PM #6
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I upload at 650px wide by somewhere between 900 and 950 tall. I've thought about making the page wider but I also try to keep the page size under 500kb or hovering around there without losing too much quality. Who knows, maybe I ought to rethink that.

I edit it a lot larger though, I think 2500xwhatever the proportion is, and draw it on 9inx12in paper.
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11 days ago, 4:01 PM #7
loved birds way before they were the word
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My canvases are big. I tend to draw at 5000px across and 300dpi.

I usually upload at 1000px wide, which is right at the limit for how large you can go before breaking the page on these site layouts. I upload as big as I can to preserve detail because my artwork is painted.
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11 days ago, 4:44 PM #8
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I tend to upload at 1200 pixels wide, which is about a third of my working size.
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11 days ago, 5:14 PM #9
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I output pages at 2894 x 4093, and then resize them for Comic Fury at 1920 x 2715. This means that most of my pages are 2.5 to 4 mb.

I usually render panels much larger than necessary too, usually 1.5 to 2x times the width of what’s needed. Helps to hide any graininess or other imperfections in the render.
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11 days ago, 5:26 PM #10
formerly DrFurball
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After scanning my panels, I then import them onto a 1850x2615 page (not sure why those dimensions, specifically.

Think it had something to do with wanting to take WiaC to print some day), then I'll crop out the extra space and resize it to 900px wide for the site, with no regard to the height (which usually turns out to be around the 1200px range).

(Fun fact: I keep separate folders for both sizes, one labeled "web version", and I almost always read it as "weeb version")
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"Horizontal scrolling? No. Vertical scrolling? Yes!", 11 days ago, 5:30 PM #11
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Right now, I go for 700 pixels in width, while the height can be whatever. I tend to be cavalier about page height because mouse wheels are a thing.
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11 days ago, 10:25 PM #12
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You might just have to experiment and see what size and dimension works best for your comics. You don't want anything too small, but you also don't want it to be so huge that the reader has to scroll their screen left and right just to see it.
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11 days ago, 11:41 PM #13
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KarToon12:
You might just have to experiment and see what size and dimension works best for your comics. You don't want anything too small, but you also don't want it to be so huge that the reader has to scroll their screen left and right just to see it.


^I'd also like to add to this and mention that the decision will also depend on how you envision others viewing your comic (example: a scrolling comic for viewing on a phone or a traditional comic intended for print will have different width restrictions than a strip comic intended to be printed in a newspaper).
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10 days ago, 6:30 PM #14
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Comic strips are often close to the same width as comic books (original art width, that is). Sure there are exceptions. That's how I planned my strip, so I could print in a comic book format by stacking 3 or 4 strips on top of each other each page. (Maybe this is the exception to the norm?)

http://rabbitsagainstmagic.com/how_to.htm

This details how cartoonists used around 13x4 inch size. Like you can get 2 or 3 strips out of a 11x17 sheet. A Sunday strip could easily be close to a comic book page drawn in landscape orientation.

http://rodmckie.blogspot.com/2008/02/mystery-of-comic-strip-sizes.html

https://blambot.com/pages/original-art-dimensions-for-american-standard-comics

In the old days the art was photographed at the publisher and they etched plates for printing. But nowadays, digital era and whatnot, I think most artists are dealing with smaller 8.5x11 scanners because 11x17 scanners are pricey. On the other hand phone cameras are pretty high DPI now, so that shouldn't be a problem.
10 days ago, 11:12 PM #15
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Thanks for all the suggestions, people! I think I know what dimentions I want to try with, so I might have a comic starting up soon! Thanks for the opinions.
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