Forum > General discussion > Good Advice from Non-Comic People
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"Good Advice from Non-Comic People", One week ago, 3:45 PM #1
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I was thinking of some feedback I got and thought of inverting the other thread subject! If you've shown your comic to people who don't regularly read them (or at least your genre), what did they say that ended up being very useful?

My therapist wanted to take a look at my comic since I'm putting a lot of time into it during the pandemic, and she brought up that though it looked good, she couldn't make heads of tails of some pages. After some really helpful tips from other comic buddies, it became clear that I was a bit too entrenched in fantasy story lingo, and my views really went up when I revised the dialogue to have simpler words instead of magic terminology.

Also, not quite verbal advice, but at the start of the comic I was holding back a lot on exaggerated magic effects because I thought it'd overshadow the rest of the art, but people at cons really stopped at the pages with effects more than the rest. So now I just do the spells as cool as they have to be!
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One week ago, 3:52 PM #2
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When I was a little kid, my cousin advised me to FIRST write the text, THEN the speech bubble around it. I had been doing it the other way around up to that point.

Ironically, nowadays I do it that way again; draw the bubble first, scan the image, edit in text XD
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One week ago, 4:04 PM #3
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This was a prose comment but it's helped thru comics too. My mom would read this middle/high school slicr of life romance novel I was writing, I'd make her read each chapter as I finished it. She said in really gentle tone and language that it felt kind of boring and she felt bad for the character, because nothing ever happened for her - I was "writing what you know" very literally so the girl just experienced rejection after rejection and every boy see had a crush on just not being interested, etc. I didn't take my mom's advice until much later, and much of my comic now is about things I haven't explicitly experienced personally.





I made basically a graphic novel as a semester project for English when I was in tenth grade where I combined all the books we had read into one story. I did the same thing for the second semester. My teacher's entire feedback which she left on the back cover read "Never stop doing this."
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One week ago, 5:05 PM #4
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My older brother told me to write fights the same way you would write a sports game! You let each team score some, you show strategy in action, everything that makes sports interesting is what makes a fight interesting.

It also makes it easy to break down the choreography.

And that's about it. I dont get a lot of unsolicited advice. Even that one was asked for tbh.
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One week ago, 6:10 PM #5
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“Do you want to go back to art school and switch careers? It is obvious you want to do comics full time.” - my beloved husband. That is what true love sounds like, folks.
One week ago, 7:00 PM #6
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Most advice I've gotten is to just make sure the speech bubbles are big enough to read. XD
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One week ago, 7:26 PM #7
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I regularly ask for direct feedback or con.crit from my close friends (who are all very used to me pestering for alpha/beta/gamma reads by now hahaaa) that no one single piece stands out as an overall thing to share.

What comes to mind instead is a phrase I read a million years ago that kept me going through all the bad advice:

"Hard Work beats Talent, when Talent forgets to Work Hard."

Obviously, it's not specifically comic-based, but it's a pretty good general bit of advice, and one that's driven me to keep pushing myself forward.
One week ago, 8:19 PM #8
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This is probably a weird place for advice for comic, or any artistic work to be coming from. In fact, the guy who said it wasn't even talking about art. I forget his name, but he was a scientist from Bleach. As he was stabbing Gance, he said this:

Always strive to be better than you were before but not perfect.

That struck me, because he's right. It's impossible to become perfect, and even if you try, you're going for an impossible goal. But you should always try to be better than you were before, even if it means taking the smallest steps possible. As long as you're making progress in your comic, you're doing something right.
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"Always strive to be better than you were before, but not perfect" - Mayuri Kurotsuchi (Bleach)
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One week ago, 8:40 PM #9
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"take a break" is the realest advice I get lol
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One week ago, 9:45 PM #10
yesterday, you said junoro
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I can second what Revzet said for sure. I mean I've heard it from both comic and non-comic people, but rest is an important part of the creative process!! Instead of comicking, read someone else's comic, play a video game, go for a walk, hang out with a friend, watch that new show you've been wanting to check out! I'm still kind of living the epiphany that taking intentional breaks gives me more energy, who would've thought?
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One week ago, 10:00 PM #11
not the one who meowed (?)
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To draw bigger panels and not use lined notebook paper :')

And the general "Go out, take opportunities, and apply yourself" type stuff is always good, too. Even the bad experiences still teach you a lot.
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One week ago, 10:10 PM #12
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"Turn on your light." - My mom in response to my drawing or scripting comics in my room with the regular light on, but not the desk lamp.
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One week ago, 11:31 PM #13
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Like the op, my best advice came from my therapist. Nothing specific, we discussed my interests between exercises, and she encouraged me to get back into it. She also showed my pages to her supervisor, and I had two of them urging me on. Unfortunately my neuropathy wasn't responding to therapy... so I lost my two biggest fans!
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One week ago, 11:53 PM #14
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Haters will try to hate, so ignore the haters
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6 days ago, 12:41 AM #15
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jellyfishin:"Turn on your light." - My mom in response to my drawing or scripting comics in my room with the regular light on, but not the desk lamp.


Very symbolic
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6 days ago, 2:08 AM #16
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Fox Of Kings Island:Haters will try to hate, so ignore the haters

Of course, this also applies to every other walk of life.
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Forum > General discussion > Good Advice from Non-Comic People
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