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"Tips", One week ago, 4:41 AM #1
Botanist
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Share tips. App shortcuts.

Shop talk.

Or ask questions.
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One week ago, 5:58 AM #2
πŸ’–πŸ’• hate πŸ’˜ death πŸ’ kill πŸ’žπŸ’—
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Do not draw every individual strand of hair, it'll break you. You must simplify
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One week ago, 6:29 AM #3
Woo
hoo
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- reuse that background. i promise nobody will notice
- set your update schedule to be slower than the rate at which you make pages. it's free buffer
- have fun with it, because your readers can tell if you're not
- make friends who also do comic stuff!! it's so much more motivating than going at it alone
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One week ago, 6:59 AM #4
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I work digitally, so my advice is largely going to be digital.

-If a decent chunk of your comic takes place in the same room/environment, it helps to build a 3D version that you can use for reference, whether it was made in The Sims, Source Filmmaker, Blender, etc.
-If you're struggling with drawing hands and you need to finish that page quickly, you can always take photos of your own hands and trace them. It's 100% ethical and it will help you tremendously.
-It helps to use a perspective ruler, especially for indoor or architectural shots. I use Lazy Nezumi with Photoshop, but I think CSP comes with one built-in.
-You can color-code your layers to make them easy to parse through at a glance. For example, I label my panel borders with red, dialogue with blue, construction with yellow, textures with orange, etc.
One week ago, 7:28 AM #5
Ominous Presence
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In the case of working with ink, embrace the fact it is a permanent medium; if you make a mistake (like a stray line or maybe a little splotch of ink from your dip pen or brush), roll with it. Improvise, and work with it and not against it. (That said this is up to the discretion of the person drawing, but nine times out of ten I will work with inking mistakes unless I end up doing something like spilling my ink bottle on the page.)

Also, don't underestimate the powerful textures you can create with a few strokes, rather than say, drawing every little imperfection and subtlety of a textured subject (as Khkddn mentioned). Also, techniques like dry brushing can be a valuable method for creating textures or values with ink!
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One week ago, 9:23 AM #6
Oh Yeah!
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Never trust a stranger with your heart.
One week ago, 9:46 AM #7
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khkddn:Do not draw every individual strand of hair, it'll break you. You must simplify


You're not my real mom you can't tell me what to do!


- Work with a technique, medium and amount of detail you are actually enjoying adding. If you feel like you've cut down too much art for speed, or added too much detail to impress but hate drawing the pages now, change it up.
- People expect art in webcomics to change over time btw. Nobody will get mad.
- Work with characters you love not character types you think you must check off a list
- Write the story you want to tell how you would enjoy reading it and how it makes you feel excited about telling. Comics or really any creative pursuits aren't a reliable 1:1:1 skill:fame:income scale. Some people who are shit will get good deals and fame, some people who are good will die un obscurity, it is what it is and you're better off enjoying your time on this planet than trying to make it big if you juuuust change one more character.

TLDR create what you love. If someone pays you first, do the stuff they want after. Otherwise, pick what you can create for years without dying on the inside.



Non-comic tip: some friends will get busy with life and appreciate you checking in on them. Adult friendships are marked by days, weeks, even years of silence and then picking up like nothing happened. But if in a friendship you're exclusively the one constantly struggling to keep the conversation going and updates happening, and if you don't check in they never do, just accept the losses and focus that energy on friends that reciprocate.
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One week ago, 11:24 AM #8
Mooderator
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khkddn:Do not draw every individual strand of hair, it'll break you. You must simplify


What about each leaf on a tree? Just wonderige
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One week ago, 11:33 AM #9

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Render scenery and characters separately to cut down on render times. You can always do shadows in post. If a page calls for a character to interact with something in the scenery, either render that one element with the character, or take your scenery render and use it as a reference image, to perfectly position the character.
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Mysterious Missouri: A saucy comic about humans and monster-folk.
6 days ago, 10:49 PM #10
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Do rough copies of your pages/scenes/chapters first. This can be little thumbnails or full size, sketch pages. This is SO useful for working out how the scene is going to actually look.

Merged Doublepost:

SupermarketCordyceps:In the case of working with ink, embrace the fact it is a permanent medium; if you make a mistake (like a stray line or maybe a little splotch of ink from your dip pen or brush), roll with it. Improvise, and work with it and not against it. (That said this is up to the discretion of the person drawing, but nine times out of ten I will work with inking mistakes unless I end up doing something like spilling my ink bottle on the page.)

Also, don't underestimate the powerful textures you can create with a few strokes, rather than say, drawing every little imperfection and subtlety of a textured subject (as Khkddn mentioned). Also, techniques like dry brushing can be a valuable method for creating textures or values with ink!


AND PS or other photo editing programs are VERY useful for cleaning up ink mistakes! Just had to do this with a page where I accidentally smeared a huge swathe of ink on an otherwise finished page.
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5 days ago, 6:35 AM #11

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mitchellbravo:What about each leaf on a tree? Just wonderige


I have not seen anyone who's done that and lived to tell the tale :P
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My comics:
God's World (one-shot, complete) - adventuring party subdues a suicidal god
bitwam: Back in this world, as myself - homeless-by-choice MC, slice-of-life/drama
First Principles (notes) - A dump for lore, concept art and shitposts, not really a comic :P

Also, a video I made about writing fight scenes :P
5 days ago, 7:01 AM #12
the one doing the crushing
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mitchellbravo:What about each leaf on a tree? Just wonderige


I have done this. Do not do this.

I repeat:

DO
NOT
DO THIS

also here’s a tip
no one will notice if you reuse a stock image for a prop that will make repeat appearances instead of drawing it over and over forever. For example, if there is a TV that will show up at least once in every scene for the foreseeable future, draw a version of it with the screen left empty so that you can put whatever you want in it later. You will save at least 4 million hours of work per page.
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5 days ago, 7:37 AM #13
Botanist
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how do people handle bringing in colour refs in CSP? so far ive seen that you can only have the ref restricted to the canvas, which im not big on, id prefer it off the canvas. or in the reference section which takes hours to set up?
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5 days ago, 10:09 AM #14
Warning: may bite
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My tip is try to learn about your medium - in my case about software you're using. Like after using clip for 3 years only now I'm learning how to use gradient maps properly and I'm like what. What. Holy fuck what? So this is how you colour patterns in a way I wanted to achieve for the last 2 years???
Oh and add some keybinds. Why click 3 times when you can click once.
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